LG Washer Springs and Shock Absorbers

LG Appliance Parts
Shop By Part Type

Popular LG Washer Springs and Shock Absorbers

Your Price
$29.11
  In Stock
Shock Absorber Kit
★★★★★
★★★★★
4 Reviews
PartSelect Number PS3522313
Manufacturer Part Number 383EER3001J
This kit includes 1 shock absorber and 2 pins.
Installation Instructions
Terry G from FORT WORTH, TX
Excessive vibration
I followed the video -- to take apart and reversed the steps to re-install. It was fairly straight forward and corrected the issue. Read more...
Your Price
$28.73
  In Stock
Spring,Hinge
★★★★★
★★★★★
7 Reviews
PartSelect Number PS3524578
Manufacturer Part Number 4970FR2084Z
Your Price
$28.26
  In Stock
Spring,Hinge
PartSelect Number PS3524574
Manufacturer Part Number 4970FR2084P
this is an individual part and does not come as a set
Your Price
$45.75
  In Stock
Shock Absorber
★★★★★
★★★★★
2 Reviews
PartSelect Number PS3522311
Manufacturer Part Number 383EER3001G
Sold individually.
Your Price
$23.14
  In Stock
Suspension Rod Assembly
PartSelect Number PS3524154
Manufacturer Part Number 4902FA1665W
Sold individually.
Your Price
$23.89
  In Stock
SUSPENSION ASSEMBLY
★★★★★
★★★★★
1 Review
PartSelect Number PS3635695
Manufacturer Part Number 4902EA1002E
Your Price
$24.03
  In Stock
Spring,Hinge
PartSelect Number PS3524577
Manufacturer Part Number 4970FR2084X
Your Price
$77.32
  Special Order
Balance Weight
PartSelect Number PS3524043
Manufacturer Part Number 4866ER0007A
Installation Instructions
David from FLORENCE, MA
Lower Balance Weight Broken Concrete Internals
The web interface is nice, however in this situation it references the wrong part which was not known until the item arrived. Customer Service handled return, however I had to call LG directly to confirm correct part number (LG p/n 4866ER0004A = p/n PS3524040) but this was only after LG also gave wrong p/n. When replacement part arrived the internal concrete had a crack in it. The part is basically a plastic shell that is filled with concrete. However the opening (about 1 x 4) is left open and with the concrete having a crack in it the piece will vibrate together and continue to break down over time (which is what happened to the original one) Before installing I chose to fill opening with epoxy and a plastic layer, then covered with electrical tape to seal it in. I feel this item is poorly designed from LG. Additionally this item was poorly packaged by PS when shipping which caused the damage (it weights about 15 lbs and was allowed to float around in a large over-sized box filled with large air pillows). I have photos but no way to upload here. Read more...
Your Price
$70.02
  Special Order
Balance Weight
PartSelect Number PS3524040
Manufacturer Part Number 4866ER0004A
  No Longer Available
Shock Absorber Assembly
★★★★★
★★★★★
1 Review
PartSelect Number PS3522309
Manufacturer Part Number 383EER3001E
Sold individually
Installation Instructions
Anthony from Crystal Lake, IL
Worn bearings
To replace the bearings a complete disassembly of the washer was required. After pulling the tube assembly from the cabinet and separating the tube enclosure halves and removing the rotor and stator, since the washer uses direct drive, a gear puller was required to push the drive shaft through the old bearings since they didn’t separate easily as seen in several YouTube videos. After removing the tube assembly it is recommended that you also separate from the spider, which contains the drive shaft, from the tube itself since a significant amount of sediment had caked inside the indentations on the inside of the spider. Since the front bearing, part number 4280FR4048D, was no longer available I used an NTN double sealed bearing, part number 6306LLUC3/L627. The only other tricky aspect of the repair was pushing the drive shaft through the new bearings since pushing it by hand did not produce enough force to get it through to expose enough of the shaft on the other side to be able to reconnect the rotor. The solution was to pull the shaft through rather than pushing it. To do this I placed a 1 3/4 inch drive socket over the outer ring of the rear bearing, and then I used a 3 inch 10mm x 1.50 mm bolt through the drive socket with enough large washers to use as spacers between the bolt head and the drive socket. I then threaded about a half inch of the bolt into the center of the drive shaft by hand to remove any gap between the bolt head and the washers. As I turned the bolt clockwise with a 17mm drive socket wrench the bolt pulled the drive shaft through the bearings with ease. I did follow the manufacturer’s recommendation to replace the seal between the two tube enclosure halves and the three dampers with new ones since they do eliminate much of the vibration during the spin cycle. I also replace the top bellows since I noticed that a large hole had been formed on it by rubbing against the inlet hoses which are situated directly above. The repair took a week only because I had to wait for parts. Read more...

Related Parts