Models > WJRR4170G1WW > Instructions

WJRR4170G1WW General Electric Washer - Instructions

All installation instructions for WJRR4170G1WW parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the washer repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the WJRR4170G1WW
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Control knob teeth were worn

  • Customer: Charles from Dallas GA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers
  • 462 of 462 people found this instruction helpful
I spoke to a very nice young ladie who took my order and I received my order within two days. I pull the clasp off of the old knob and replace the knob and the clasp with the new part and it now works great. Thank you for helping me find the part I needed.

The original Knob just fell apart

  • Customer: Irina from Englewood NJ
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 361 of 363 people found this instruction helpful
The repair was so easy when I got the part, I did it myself without any help in 5 seconds!

Washing Machine was not draining water from tub.

  • Customer: Gerald from Midlothian VA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers
  • 147 of 156 people found this instruction helpful
1. Drained the wash tub by taking the drain hose from the back of the washing machine and dropping it below the tub - water flowed out of hose a lot easier than trying to suck water out of tub using a pump (tried this on the first time I tried to fix washer). (Washing machine on 2nd floor of house and didn't want water running on floor)
2. Removed the 2 bolts holding the Pump/Motor assembly to the machine.
3. Removed both hose clamps on the Pump/Motor assembly and removed Pump.
4. Attached the new drain inlet hose to the pump and then to the tub with the original hose clamps.
5. Attached the drain hose to the pump and then plugged in the 2 wires for the pump.
6. Plugged in the washing machine and everything worked.

NOTES:
1. Hardest part was working with hose clamps (spring type clamps) in the tight space under the machine.
2. Easier to fix since I pulled machine apart a few days before - removing the clog in the pump/motor assembly only to get everything back together to find out that the motor was dead. Still well worth the time and effort due to not having to go out and buy a new Machine...

washing machine would not go through all cycles or agitate

  • Customer: Brian from Millerplace NY
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 101 of 131 people found this instruction helpful
After removing frt panel which prys off I checked for anything obvious like a loose belt. Then I jiggled the magnet switch located on the inside of the loading cover. I saw the machine start agitating the it stopped again when I stopped touching it. I ordered the new part and spliced it in with the wire crip tool. Now the machine is A ok.

Knob and timer worn/broken where engaging.

  • Customer: Dewey from Mesquite TX
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 120 of 191 people found this instruction helpful
Removed clip from old knob with needle nose pliers and removed knob. Pulled indicator dial off of the timer shaft. Removed three screws with nut driver from top of back panel and opened control panel.
One screw holds the timer mechanism in place. Unplugged wiring harness from timer and removed screw. Removed timer. There are tabs that the timer sits in. Make sure you have reinstalled the timer correctly in place.
Installed new timer and replaced screw. Closed control panel and replaced the three screws in back panel.
Slid indicator guide down over timer shaft making sure to line up the tab on dial with notch in nylon shaft. Slide know over metal shaft and replace the clip which holds the knob in place. Operate washer according to instructions. In the future be sure to turn your knob slowly when setting the wash cycle. Turning it too quickly can wear out or break the parts once more.

Control knob stripped

  • Customer: Robert from Joppa MD
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers
  • 54 of 58 people found this instruction helpful
The teeth on the control knob were broken off (not sure how it happened). the teeth on the stem of the knob turn the selector dial. To replace the control knob, I used a pair of needle nose pliers to remove the pin clip and pulled the knob off. The new control knob came with the clip already installed on the stem of the knob. It was a matter of pushing the new knob onto the shaft . . . and the rest is history.

broken drive belt

  • Customer: jon from barry IL
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 41 of 49 people found this instruction helpful
To diagnose, first I unhooked the washer: power, water supply, and drain pipe. I then slid the washer out, laying it on its front. With nutdriver, I unscrewed two screws that held the other end of the drain tube and removed it completely. Then, again with the nutdriver removed 4 screws from the back near the legs, two in between the legs in the middle, and approx. 4 to 6 on the bottom. This let me pull the bottom off partially to access the motor area. (I did did not take the bottom completely off, only about 2/3 off and let it bend over, as it was flexible tin) The belt was broken. After receiving the new belt, I positioned it between the pulley and the motor and between the drum and the big pulley. Then I rotated the big pulley, pulling the belt onto it as I rotated. At the same time, as I rotated, I pulled the other end of the belt on to the little pulley. Once it was on, I would put pressure on it as I turned the pulley, to jump the belt to the appropriate grooves on the little pulley. Note: the replacement belt had been modified, so it had one less groove than the pulley. I would have known this if I had read the insert that came with the belt first! Anyway, this was not a problem, only a design change. Also it was important to start the belt on the inside, so if it slipped, you didnt loose your bite. Total diagnostic, repair, and reassembly time: 30 minutes plus or minus. I had read other online forums that said you had to loosen the motor, etc. And I do know some type of a belt installation tool was offered on line, but I got along fine with my installation method. An extra set of hands would have been helpful, but not necessary.

machine would not drain all other functions seemed o.k

  • Customer: douglas from danby VT
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Socket set
  • 34 of 34 people found this instruction helpful
Aside from getting the wet clothes and most of the water out,the toughest part of the job for me was to figure out how to get inside the machine. I nearly wrecked the thing trying to lift the top panel. After some frustration I removed the star-type screws on back of the control panel and found, tucked away neatly, the documentation/parts list complete with instructions on how to remove the FRONT panel. Once I got inside it was easy to locate the pump. I ran the drain cycle for a moment to see if the pump turned at all. The original had an exposed fan so it was easy to see that indeed the motor was not turning. I inspected all the hose and electrical connections to make sure I had the tools I'd need and the savvy to replace the part(s) if I could locate them. I'm not much of a web-head, so I was a little surprised when I typed G.E. appliances and the search took me to partselect.com where I was pretty much coached through the procedure before I even ordered the part. The box arrived ahead of schedule (yay) and when I looked at the pump it didn't look much like the one I was replacing. But then I realized it was the same thing just ten years more advanced. I used a small pair of vise grips to pinch and lock the pipe clamps open. I know there is a plier made for this, but... Anyways, after loosening the clamps and sliding them away from the pump I pulled the hoses off and let the last of the rinse water still in them run down my shirt sleeve to my elbow. (optional, not recommended) Thus refreshed I then rummaged through my socket set and found what I needed to remove the 2 sheet metal mounting screws and disconnected the 2 power leads. I removed the faulty pump and proudly showed it to my wife. Unimpressed, she asked how much longer. I quickly reversed the procedure to install the new unit and confidently piled in a load of laundry. The cycle completed just fine and has done so since. I will and have recommmended partselect.com to friends and will use it again for sure.

Old Hose Had A Leak

  • Customer: Anthonie from Beale AFB CA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Wrench set
  • 33 of 36 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the screws that held the hose drain hose clip in place. Removed the damaged hose. Placed the new drain hose clip at the end of the new drain hose. Re-inserted back in hole, pushed in hose to necessary depth then tighted screws, Very easy and painless.

Timer on the washing machine wasn't working properly. Just spinning around not catching to set wash cycle

  • Customer: Kristina from Pasadena CA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 32 of 34 people found this instruction helpful
I found Partselect and searched for what I needed. Wasn't quite sure I had the right timer, so I called and gave them the model number and they did a search and found the right one. I ordered the part online and a few days later the parts were delivered to me. The timer fit right in and looked just like the origninal. Within 30 mins. washer was back in service.
Another washer we have on the property wasn't agitating correctly. After taking off the agitator ( by pulling straight up from the bottom ) I found that the coggs on the agitator hub were all worn out. I removed the center screw from the shaft and pulled the old hub off. Installed the new one ordered from Partselect and washwer was back up and running in no time.

Pump and Motor Assembly began leaking and then seized.

  • Customer: Michael from Alexandria IN
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 25 of 27 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the front panel by prying it forward with a Screw driver away from the side panels at the top (wrap a shop rag around the Screw driver to keep from scratching the paint). Once you have the panel pried loose at the top ... lean it forward until you can lift it off the tab type hooks at the bottom.
I next unplugged the wires from the motor. The orginal motor had three wires ... two on top and one on the left side. The one on the side is a ground wire for the open frame motor. The replacement motor is sealed and does not require this wire. Just leave it unplugged when the new one is installed.
Next I removed the inlet hose that attaches to the back of the pump. Remove it by loosening the hose clamp and removing it from the bottom of the tub, leaving it attached to the back of the pump. It is much easier to remove and transfer to the new pump once it is out rather than fight with the spring type clamp on the back of the pump in the close quarters inside the machine.
Next I removed the outlet hose from the top of the pump. Squeeze the spring clamp with Pliers and work it up and off the pump.
Now I just used a Socket to remove the two bolts holding the bracket to the inside front of the machine and removed the assembly.
I now removed the inlet hose from the back of the old pump. Just squeeze the spring clamp with Pliers and work it up the hose and off the pump. Transfer the hose to the back of the new pump reusing the same clamp.
I now bolted the assembly back into the machine, reattached the outlet hose to the pump, and then reattached inlet hose to the bottom of the tub. All that was left to do was plug in the two wires to the top front of the pump motor (as I mentioned earlier, leave the side wire from the old pump unplugged as it is not needed on the new one). I then ran the machine for a few moments with the front off to check for any leaks and then put the front panel back on.
The whole replacement cost about $50 and took barely 15 min. from start to finish. The machine now works perfectly.

Washer would not change cycles.

  • Customer: Tommy from Reynolds GA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 21 of 23 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the dials and the cover, removed the one screw that held the timer in place, disconnected the wireing harness and pluged it into the new timer set it in place and replaced the screw that held it in place,replace cover and dials. [ anyone could do it. ] Thanks,Tommy

washer didn't spin & water would not pump out

  • Customer: Ken from West Monroe NY
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Wrench set
  • 20 of 23 people found this instruction helpful
removed hoses and clamps. removed 2 bolts on pump. put it back together. done 15 min.

Water leakage from the bottom of the tub through the shaft seal

  • Customer: Dave from Willcox AZ
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 17 of 19 people found this instruction helpful
Thanks to comments already summited to Partselect I was prepareed for the worst. Once I figured out that you remove the agitator assembly with a swift jerk I was able to access the lower portion of the tub. As others have found out the aluminum nut holding the inner tub can not be removed without a hammer and chisel. Once you get past that things go well. What is left is cleaning the components and re-assembling.

Knob spun freely due to stripped teeth.

  • Customer: Robert from Washburn TN
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 18 of 23 people found this instruction helpful
Part Select inclusion of parts diagram helped determine which part was broken, and how to disassemble just what was necessary. I was planning to open up the control panel to get inside, which was not necessary. Assembly was simple for the same reason. Sometimes, it does help to read the "manual" first....
All Instructions for the WJRR4170G1WW
1-15 of 332