Models > RAX7245BW0 > Instructions

RAX7245BW0 Roper Washer - Instructions

All installation instructions for RAX7245BW0 parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the washer repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the RAX7245BW0
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Washer filled v e r y slowly

  • Customer: Jonathan from Arlington VA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 22 of 25 people found this instruction helpful
I'd noticed for a while that our 15-year-old Kenmore washer was filling slowly, but when it started to take 30 minutes to fill to the "medium" level, I knew something was really wrong. There was plenty of water pressure, so I replaced a hose that was loaded with minerals and cleaned the filter (also clogged with minerals). But that didn't help! So I ordered a new water inlet valve, and replaced that. There's nothing tricky about the repair -- the hardest part is opening and closing the washer, for which I found instructions online. (Even so, it's the most time-consuming part of the project.) The result is the washer now fills as fast as when it was new. Just for fun, I took apart the old valve and expected to find it encrusted with minerals, but it looked fine, so I'm not sure where the actual breakdown was. But since the part only cost $25 -- less than a service call, for sure -- I was very happy to use a half hour of my time and keep the machine going a while longer.

Upper agitator stopped moving

  • Customer: Craig from Yadkinville NC
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 22 of 26 people found this instruction helpful
First, I removed the softner cup from the top of the agitator. Second, I removed the plastic seal by pulling it out. I then used a socket to remove the bolt holding the agitator down. I then removed the agitiator from the machine and seperated the upper and lower agitator by placing my feet on the lower agitator and pulling up. The dog-ears were in the upper agitaotr section and easy to see and replace. I re-assembled in reverse order. The whole process took less than 30 minutes.

Screw agitator would free spin

  • Customer: Charles from San Diego CA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 21 of 24 people found this instruction helpful
Job was easy! Just remove the top cap with a screw driver. With a socket and extension, remove the bolt that holds the agitator to the transmission shaft. Pull up on the agitator and lift it off the shaft. I had to use the screw driver to pry off the center piece that held the cogs because it did not what to separate from the rest of the agitator. Removed the pieces of the old, broken cogs, cleaned up the parts and installed the new cogs with the center piece upside down. I then took some silicone lubricant and lubed the area the cogs rub on and the opening the center piece spins in on the rest of the agitator. I then removed the Thrust Spacer on the mail part of the agitator but just lifting off the old one and putting on the new one. Then, with the center piece that holds the cogs upside down I inserted it into the upper corkscrew section of the agitator so that the cogs would not fall out. While holding the two pieces together, I turned it back right-side-up and installed it back onto the other part of the agitator and then on the shaft. Re-installed the bolt and tightened with the socket. That's it! It sounds more complicated then it really was.

Washer would not spin and the agitator would not turn

  • Customer: Gilbert from Fair Lawn NJ
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 23 of 31 people found this instruction helpful
I basically dismantled the washer and turned the washer over to access the motor,transmission and pump.I disconnected the electrical connections first.I then released the clips for the pump and the clips for the transmission.The coupler was broken in little pieces.I went to Google to search for parts and happened to reach your Web Site.I found the part number for the coupler from the schematic and ordered it.It was then I discovered the part number for the cam dogs for the agitator so I ordered it also.While on you site I read the various troubleshooting stories and how each was repaired.I put myself through a lot of unnecessary work by dismantling the whole washer when all I had to do was turn it over and access it from the bottom.The parts arrived in three days and the install was rather simple thanks to the direction of your site.I had a heck of a time reassembling the washer but all in all $42.00 was a lot cheaper than a repairman or a new washer.We now have a working washer and no leaks.
Thanks to your site ,I have a happy wife and clean clothes.

leaking from tub

  • Customer: Debra from Milton - Freewater OR
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: More than 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 20 of 22 people found this instruction helpful
First I turned off the water and unplugged the washer from the outlet. I took the two screws off the console and turned it up to undo the clips that hold the cabinet to the back. I took out the 2 phillips screws at the top corners of the back. I was then able to pull cabinet off and not have to remove the console, but carefully slid it to the side, as ther wires were still attached.
Pried off agitator cap & reached into agitator to pry out another cap to access 7/16 bolt. Checked over the agitator parts for wear (dogs) Took agitator, top outer (white) and inner (brown) tub rings off.
Sprayed lots of liqid wrench around spanner nut and drive block and gave it time to work. Used spanner tool to get spanner nut off. Hard work. Pounded and pounded and pounded and pounded with hammer. It gave a tiny bit. Then I got an idea: I pounded it back the other way, as you would to tighten. This helped. I then pounded back the other way and did this again. It worked amazingly well.
Got to drive block and it was rusted out along the bottom and also hard to get off. The diagram showed a "lock" (horseshoe shaped thing) on top of it, but mine was all in one piece but I couldn't tell that. I sprayed and pryed and pounded from the bottom and it split in half. It needed to be replaced anyway.
The inner tub was also hard to get out and I used some dish liquid. I pushed down, (using the rags here, the edges can cut you). I twisted, I pulled. I pushed, I pulled, I cussed, and begged. I then went to bed and then next day I pushed backwards and forwards and side to side & finally it came off. Then I undid the brackets on the bottom of the outer tub along the bottom and disconnected the clear hose in back. When loosening the black hose clamp in front to the pump, water started to come out of the hose so I grabbed a cool whip container to catch it. It smelled yucky. Once I had the outer tub off I put the new seal in, using some plumber's grease to help get ithe tub over the shaft..Then I hooked up the hoses & brackets on the bottom of the outer tub. I cleaned out the outer tub, as there was crud in the bottom. Then I poured about 5 gallons of water in it to see if the seal was set in right. Make sure the drain hose hasn't fallen out! (You can leave this water in the tub, you'll find out why) I cleaned up the rust on tube of the inner tub with steel wool and inspected everything else. Something didn't look quite right about the outer shaft that goes around the spin tube. It looked like something should go there. I discovered there SHOULD have been a seal there but one was never put in. So I put one in. I used a little grease to help put the new drive block on, and tightened the spanner nut with the spanner wrench. I put everything else back on EXCEPT for the cabinet-with the console attached. Ha Ha All the other directions I read wrote to take the console off first. If I had done that I wouldn't have been able to do the most important part of the job: testing the result. I finished filling the tub to the lowest water level to watch it go thru it's cycles and checked for leaks. If the console was "flopped over" the back how can you check? (I don't play with wiring)
I turned off the water & unplugged the washer and slid the cabinet on.. I tipped the console back to access the large gold squiggly brackets that hold the cabinet to the back and reattached them to the back, by removing them, hooking them onto the back, and snapping them into place. I double-DOUBLE checked to see if anything had come loose, then slid the console first on top of the back and put the two screws back in. The screws on my machine are not covered up by the end caps, but they are at a wierd angle, so I held the console up slighly and started the screws first. As they tightened down the console slid into the holes on the cabinet.
There is a small sppliance shop in my town & the guy loaned me the spanner wrench. It was very nice of him.I guess I will have to give his & his famil

Unbalanced and walk across the floor on spin cycle

  • Customer: James M from Elkhart IN
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 23 of 31 people found this instruction helpful
Part Select provided the problem determination information and the video on how to install the replacement parts. I ran into one problem, I could not remove the lock nut to remove the inter and outer tub. I should have bought the special wrench for $14, no local DYI or hardware store had the wrench. So, after examination I used a large screwdriver and wood block to lift the tubs up just enough to remove the old pads and replace with the new. The old pads showed only a wear, but was enough to spin the tubs off balance. The new tabs made the washing machine work like new. New washer $500, repair man $150, parts and information from Part Select $20 bucks, priceless.

Acting like it was unbalanced

  • Customer: Michael from Glenburn ME
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers, Wrench set
  • 20 of 22 people found this instruction helpful
I thought I would find broken springs but everything looked good. Comments and video very helpful.I figured springs must be stretched or worn out ,so for the money I figured worth a try. Insallation went well, washingmachine runs like a new machine. Much better than spending money on a new one. Thanks

Washing machine shook violently while on spin cycle

  • Customer: Tom from Bloomfield Hills MI
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 18 of 19 people found this instruction helpful
Disconnected the bracket screws that held the suspension springs in place - fed new springs into bracket and reattached. Local repairman told me that springs dont wear out, they break - wrong, they do lose their tension and thereby lose the ability to counterbalance the spinning load. Washing machine now spins like new - no wobble or shake.

valves allowed water to overflow during the rinse cycle, sometimes took forever to fill.

  • Customer: Sam from Robertsville MO
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 19 of 23 people found this instruction helpful
I removed the screws holding the control unit down, removed a couple at the rear,
Disconnected the electrical clip that plugs into the top, under the control unit.
This allows enough slack to pivot it ( the control unit) upside down and get it out of the way enough to remove the spring clips that hold the top to the back.
Popped out the two clips that hold the back to the top.
Pulled the back out, up until the plastic soap dispenser , (which is attached to the back) hits under the lip of the top.
This does not allow enough room to get to the valves.
I finally figured out you have to lift the entire top up high enough to clear the back while pulling it ( the back) out.
Disconnected the hose clamp, electric connectors, installed the new valves into the supplied mounting plate replaced the valves .
Re -connected the hose and electric connectors and re assembled the back.
The only problem I had was when one of the spring retainers that hold the back to the top popped off and fell inside the unit, which forced me to remove everything including the back bottom screws, which caused the sides to pop off, the mounting ears , which are attached to the back,
Took some finesse but finally retrieved the spring clamp and finished everything back together.
It was a bit tricky keeping the plastic gaskets between the back and the sides from falling inside as I reassembled it.
But all is well, and would have been more difficult without the expierence written by others who posted, on the site.
Thank you to all, for the help.
I hope my efforts will help someone else.

Top portion of the agitator finally quit working. Cams that engage the action wore down.

  • Customer: Edwin from Plainfield IL
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Socket set
  • 18 of 20 people found this instruction helpful
Repair was simple, after finding the correct part from Partselect. Exact match. Old part out with removal of one bolt, new agitator assembly installed in five minutes. Works great and saved me from buying a new washer. Cost of repair about $80.00, replace washing machine, about $600.00.

agitator making noise and didn't want to turn

  • Customer: Jo Anne from Crossville TN
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Socket set
  • 17 of 18 people found this instruction helpful
I unsnapped the top of the mechanism and removed the agitor assembly, (I had already put together the new one,) I just had to unsrew the old one to get it out and screw in the new one. This took me less than 10 minutes from start to finish. My husband was away for the week and this was left up to me if I wanted it done. So I (a female) decided that I would attempt it.
A Piece of Cake. thanks to Parts Select, I have a few more years with this machine. I was really hating to purchase a new machine. So for less than $25.00 with no service call "I Fixed It!"

worn water pump and worn aggitator cogs

  • Customer: Chris from Morgan City LA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 17 of 18 people found this instruction helpful
leaned and propped washing machine back to get access to pump, removed hose clamps and hoses,removed retainer clips, old pump was stuborn to remove but was able to pry off motor with screwdriver. sanded rust off metal shaft,put on new pump,replaced retainer clips, replaced hoses and clamps. set washer in upright position removed aggitator cap, used 7/16' socket with long extension,unscrewed bolt, pulled off aggitator sleave, removed cog unit, replaced cogs, put sleve back on and tightened bolt. I had the machine outside so I hooked up a water hose and an extension cord, put machine on small load and tested machine . worked like new. also when i finished the test I had noticed earlier that my hose screen had a mineral build up, cleaned that by lightly scraping and used little rust inhibitor that also tackles scales. total time was about 30 minutes. Wife is happy now and I was rewarded later.

water leak at pump

  • Customer: oscar from missouri city TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 16 of 17 people found this instruction helpful
1. remove 2 hoses at pump using pliers to open hose clamps and sliding them out of the way.
2. remove 2 retainers holding pump with screwdriver.
3. remove old pump and install new pump
4. clamp pump using retaining clips
5. re-connect hoses

Water constantly dripped into washer when it was off.

  • Customer: MARK from MARION MA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 16 of 17 people found this instruction helpful
Turned off water and pulled power plug, Then unscrewed hot and cold hoses from washer.
I took off the top control by undoing the 2 screws in front and then the two screws on the back plastic latches. Mover it forware and took off the 2 screws on the bottom of the back which came up and off easily. Undid the two screws holding the Water valve to the back and undid the water outlet tube and the wireing. Replaced with new valve and reattached tubing and wires. Screwed back on and reattached controls.
Actually was very easy even without repair manual to the washing machine.

leak from the front, bottom edge

  • Customer: Bryant from Jacksonville FL
  • Difficulty: Difficult
  • Time to Complete: More than 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 19 of 26 people found this instruction helpful
First I watched the vid, from this website that showed how to replace a pump on the Whirlpool model I have. It was very helpful. Then, on the same web page as the vid for washer pump replacement several DIYers describe how they did the repair and rate how difficult it was. This also was very helpful. The info from these two sources confirmed to me that it was the pump that was leaking. Tilting the washer back far enough so I could see the pump also visually confirmed it was the pump.
If the pump had come off easily I would not have had to take the cabinet off. All I would have had to do was lay the washer on its' back to get the pump off. But noooo, the pump was rusted so tightly to the motors' shaft that I had to be more aggressive, to remove the pump, than the measures mentioned in the vid.
After finally getting the pump off I saw that the end of the motors' shaft had corroded and was misshapened enough so that I had to "persuade" the new pump onto the shaft.
I also ordered these parts (1. Direct Drive Coupling 2. Agitator Repair Kit and 3. Clutch Assembly) after I read in the DIYers descriptions that many of them, who changed their pump, also changed these parts. Since my washer was 15 yrs old it made sense to replace these parts which usually wear out before the pump.
Unfortunately, after I got everything reassembled the new pump leaked more than the old one. Guess I over-"persuaded" the new pump onto the shaft. That, and I don't think the new pump is as well built as the original so it couldn't take much persuasion.
Now I either: 1. buy a new pump and motor or 2. buy a new washer which is what I'll most likely do.
If I had a do-over I would only get the pump. If it worked properly with no leaks, then I would buy the other 3 parts, if it didn't work, I would only be out $40 instead of the $95 I'm out for the 4 items. Being frugal or, as my family says, "cheap," I do have to be careful. There is a point where repairing something old is more a point of pride than good sense. I don't know where that point is and I definitely wouldn't have brought this up if the new pump had fixed the washer.
Also, after struggling for quite some time to put the cabinet back on, I Googled "how do I get a Whirlpool washer cabinet back on?" After watching one of the vids Google answered back-I was able to put the cabinet back on in less than 10 minutes.
I hope this has been helpful. Happy DIYing!
All Instructions for the RAX7245BW0
46-60 of 1,720