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See part 22 in the diagram

Rear Outer Tub Assembly

PartSelect Number PS418071

The seal and bearing are included and are not sold separately.

This part works with the following brands: Frigidaire, Gibson, Kelvinator, Kenmore, Tappan & White-Westinghouse.

This part fixes the following symptoms:

  • Noisy.
  • Compare At

    $420.85
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    $70.14
  • Your Price

    $350.71
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Installation Instructions Provided by PartSelect customers like you.

Average Repair Rating: 1.7 / 5.0, 7 reviews What's this?
1-7 of 7
 

100 of 118 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used

Level of DifficultyDifficult

Time to do repair:More than 2 hours

ToolsNutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench set

CustomerScott from Riverview FL

Drum making loud noise

Turned out drum brackets were corroded, so drum and shell-rear/brg and gasket needed replacing

1. Disconnect power and water lines
2. Remove rear and top panels
3. Remove control knobs, Assembly, soap dispenser, and Assembly cons frame/trim
4. Remove all screws from control panel mounting bracket (panel-cont mtg wing bend), disconnect easy wires to get to so you can flip it on it's edge when the time comes - no need to remove completely
5. Disconnect hoses running to shell-rear/brg
6. Remove the motor (motor-Sole) and belt
7. Place foam pad and/or jack with pad on it underneath shell (it's gonna be very heavy when you remove it - two men or a jack required)
8. Lift and remove the two spring/sleeves that support the shell.
9. Remove two level-shocks below shell or at a minimum remove one of the pins on each
10. Remove Spring boot from bellow
11. Lower and remove entire shell
12. Remove the weight, upper back from the rear shell and the counterweights from the front shell (can leave front weights if you want to, but probably easier to work with without them on. Note: be careful, these all crack/chip very easily)
13. Remove the screws that hold the rear shell to the front shell
14. Remove the pulley screw and pulley (may take a little wiggling or tapping with rubber mallet to loosen)
15. Separate the rear shell from front shell.
16. Remove the drum from the rear shell (may also require some wiggkling/tapping with rubber mallet)

Note: I did this from memory, so probably missed some steps - just use your parts manual to ensure you know what you're looking at and it will help you through the process.

Good luck. I figure I saved about $700 to $1200 since the estimated repair costs were so high, I would have simply had to buy a new washer.

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40 of 46 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used

Level of DifficultyA Bit Difficult

Time to do repair:More than 2 hours

ToolsNutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench set

CustomerKevin from Gilman IA

Drum noise when spinning,timer knob broke

First of all the timer knob was very easy. My wife changed it in about two minutes. Simply spin the old off and the new on. Replacing the shell with the tub bearing is much more involved. Remove the rear cover, lower front panel and top. Remove belt from motor and then the motor itself. I used my cordless drill with a socket adapter and extensions to reach the screws. Disconnect the wiring and take the motor out of the machine. Disconnect the bellow type hose on bottom and small hose from the soap dispenser on top front shell. Support the drum on two 2 by 4's or 6's. Remove the top pins of the shock absorbers and lean back out of the way. The tub is now hanging on the top springs and is still held in place with the front boot. The boot needs to be seperated fron the washer with a single blade razor. This was the second time I did this repair so my boot came loose easily. With one person lifting the front and one in the rear lift the shell unit to remove the top springs. The bracket that keep the springs in place need to be removed prior to this.
Slide the tub unit out the back of washer. I placed it front down by supporting it on 2 by 4's. Remove the large rear pulley. This was tough as moisture had rusted it together. Apply pressure evenly around the pulley with small bars as you tap the slightly loosen bolt that hold the pulley on. This should work the pulley free. Using my cordless drill I removed all the bolts holding the rear and front tubs together and reassembled following the reverse of this procedure. One problem I now have is that the shaft of the stainless steel tub is worn and I still have noise. Again, this is my second replacement of this bearing each about 4 years apart. I will not do the repair again as price of tub and rear shell are to expensive. I was very satisfied after my first repair and encourage you to try before purchasing new.

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27 of 34 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used

Level of DifficultyA Bit Difficult

Time to do repair:More than 2 hours

ToolsNutdriver, Screw drivers, Socket set

CustomerMike from Clear Lake MN

Rear tube brackets broke, made a banging sound in final spin

My repair went well except I removed the rubber seal between the tube shell and front door, BIG MISTAKE! Next time I will leave the front half of the tube shell in tack in the washer and just remove the rear half of the shell. If it wasn't for having to reinstall the rubber seal between the tube shell and the front door, the whole project could have been down in under two hours.

Food for thought next time! :-)

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21 of 24 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used

  • Rear Outer Tub Assembly

Level of DifficultyDifficult

Time to do repair:More than 2 hours

ToolsPliers, Screw drivers, Socket set

CustomerMihaela from DAVENPORT IA

Bearing/whining noise loudest during spin cycle

I first removed the top and rear panels to expose the shell, then removed belt and motor. I used a 2 jaw pulley puller to remove rear pulley, there are 5 spokes in the pulley so the puller did not fit well but I managed to hook on the pulley and hit the puller with a hammer and it came off. A better way would have been using a 5 jaw puller and installing the bolt a few threads in the drum shaft to protect the threads. I removed the rear concrete counter weight then removed the lower shock absorber pins at the shell and placed shocks to the side, this left the shell hanging on the springs. I decided to split the shell in the machine to avoid removing the front half of the shell, so I removed 20 bolts holding the shell halves together [difficult] and propped the front half of the shell up on wood blocks to release weight on springs. I then removed springs because they hook into both halves of the shell. This freed the rear half of the shell with the drum. I took the rear shell/drum assembly and placed the shell on 2 saw horses with the drum shaft vertical and the drum hanging freely with cardboard on the floor beneath to catch the drum, then installed an old bolt in the drum shaft to protect the shaft and threads and hit the old bolt with a hammer driving the drum shaft from bearings. Do not hit the shaft directly with a hammer, it will dammage the shaft and the pulley will not go back on. I cleaned corrosion from shaft and seal area with very fine sand paper and lubricated same with oil. The drum shaft slid easily into the new bearings on the new shell and I reassembled the machine in reverse order. Thank you to the others who wrote about this repair. The information was very helpfull.
Jim Swanson

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17 of 18 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used

  • Rear Outer Tub Assembly

Level of DifficultyA Bit Difficult

Time to do repair:More than 2 hours

ToolsPliers, Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench set

CustomerLester from Olympia WA

Noisey sound getting louder during spin cycle

Please note that I went online first to get an idea of what was involved.
I removed the back panel using a cordless drill w/attachment for the screws. Then the top. The directions that I received online was very helpful, but I didn't remove the whole tub assembly. I don't recommend doing it my way, but it can be done without removing the front or the whole tub assembly. After the motor and the big pulley was removed, I removed the bottom "shocks". I then took out every one of the cap screws that hold the 2 halves together. When that was done the two halves were loose. I then supported the bottom and took out the two springs. The back half came out quite easily then. It is then necessary to use a mallet to remove the inner drum from the bearing and back half of the tub. I cleaned and inspected the "spider" which was fine except it had old soap in it. Then using a dremel tool with a plastic brush I cleaned/polished the shaft of the inner tub. The new rear shell fit perfectly. Supporting the bottom of the front half of the tub, I then placed the back half assembly (with the pulley replaced on the shaft) in proximity and started the cap screws. It is weird how the 2 halves don't want to stay in correct alignment, but it can be done. After I got most of the top screws in, I used a ratchet wrench to tighten them to almost where the 2 halves were touching. That helped with the alignment process. When all (Ibelieve there are around 17 screws) were started and the 2 halves were aligned, I then started at the top and tightened to a loose fit. The second time around I tightened to semi tight. At this time I could put the springs back on (greatly improves ability to reach the bottom screws). The third time around I put them all tight. Every thing went back on without a problem. I attached water and power to the unit and ran a cycle with the top off and checked for leaks. That's it.

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10 of 12 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used

  • Rear Outer Tub Assembly

Level of DifficultyDifficult

Time to do repair:More than 2 hours

ToolsNutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench(Adjustable)

CustomerBernie from Point Roberts WA

Noise during spin cycle

Using a cordless drill and driver bit I removed the back cover, bottom front cover and top. I then removed the rubber bellowed hose connecting the soap dispenser to the rubber boot in front. This one was tricky to reinstall because the fastener for the hose is twisted steel wire that needs to be undone when reinstalling. It slid off easily enough but would not slide back on easily. There is a second small bellowed hose that connects the dispenser to the outer drum casing. This needs to be removed as well. It comes off easily and went back on easily. I used a one sided razor to cut the glue dots connecting the front boot to the washer door frame. After that I removed the belt from the motor and drum pulley by hand and then removed the motor mounting bolts using a ratchet and socket. This went smoothly. I now propped up the drum using 4x4 cutoff blocks to take the weight off the springs and shocks. I then removed to the lower upper plastic pins that hold the shock onto the plastic spin drum casing. I used a wooded block and a hammer to tap the pins out. Be sure to push in the lock on the tapered end of pin shaft. The second pin was a little more difficult to remove and required quite a bit of tapping to push it all the way through. I tried adjusting the weight on the shocks several times to make it easier to come out. The pin was slightly damaged by the time I got it out from hitting it. It went back in OK so I don't think the damage will cause any problems. Next I got someone to help lift the drum to release the weight on the springs and removed then from the top end. You need to remove the spring clamps that hold the spring down at the top end. I used a wrench to remove the bolt that holds the pullet on the drum shaft. The pulley was easy to pry off shaft by placing two flat screw drivers between the shaft and the bearing casing and twisting the screw drivers. Once the pulley was removed I turned the spin drum casing upside down and supported the outer casing with two stacks of 4x4 cutoff blocks. This would allow the stainless steel drum to be supported above the floor and drop freely as the shaft worked it way out of the bearing casing. Getting the drum shaft out of the outer housing bearing was the most difficult part of this whole process. The shaft was rusty and therefore did not easily slide through the two bearing casings. Before hitting the drum shaft to remove it from the bearing casing I put the washer and bolt back on the shaft to protect the shaft from hammer/mallet damage. I tried a mallet but it only moved the shaft part way and then it wouldn't slide further. I then used a 1/2" steel pipe cutoff as a punch seated around the pulley bolt to alloy me to use a hammer to beat the shaft out of the bearing casing. It required a tremendous amount of force to move the shaft. Once the shaft was removed from the old drum casing I spent some time cleaning the back of the stainless steel drum including using emery cloth to remove the rust from the shaft and polish it the best I could. Be sure not to damage the brass bushing that the rubber bearing seal rides on to prevent water leakage. Once the drum and shaft were cleaned up the reassembly process when smoothly I simply reassembled the washer in the reverse order or the disassembly. The shaft went into the new bearings snugly which I was pleased to see since the snug fit meant that the water would be sealed in and the drum would spin true. The hardest part was reattaching the large bellowed hose onto the soap dispenser because it require undoing the twisted steel wire clamp and getting it back together in a very tight space. I use a combination of a flat screw driving and a needle nose pliers to wrestle it back together. The finished job resulted in a very quiet smoothly operating washer which we expect will give us another 5 years of service.

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10 of 14 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used

  • Rear Outer Tub Assembly

Level of DifficultyDifficult

Time to do repair:More than 2 hours

ToolsNutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench set, Wrench(Adjustable)

CustomerMichael from El Cajon CA

Falling apart!

It started out with the tub not draining. No problem, has happened before. Remove bottom panel, take boot off of extractor motor, clear out book & check impeller for obstructions. Noticed belot was off. Got new belt. Belt would not stay on, bearings shot. Bearings are pressed into rear outer tub shell. Must remove pulley to get tubs apart. Good luck! Pulley was corroded onto shaft of inner tub. Used various tools, finally ended up grabbing hammer and beating it. Screwed up threads, broke pulley, but got it apart. Re-tapped threads, ordered new pulley. Finally got everything together. Worked intermittantly. Thought it was motor going out. Ordered new motor. It was door switch. Done spending money, bypassed door sensor. Whew! We have clean clothes! Ended up costing about half the price of a new unit, but it basically IS a new unit! Plus I have a spare motor for when that finally goes out!

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