344510-1-S-Whirlpool-3387134           -Cycling Thermostat
344510-1-S-Whirlpool-3387134           -Cycling Thermostat 344510-2-S-Whirlpool-3387134           -Cycling Thermostat http://www.partselect.com/Schematics/Maytag/RSDYZ2AA.gif

Cycling Thermostat

PartSelect Number PS344510

Manufacturer Part Number 3387134
Manufactured by Whirlpool

Cycling thermostats continually cycle the heating element off and on to maintain a constant inner temperature. This particular cycling thermostat has a limit of 155 degrees Fahrenheit and a differential of 25 degrees. Meaning that with this thermostat, the heating element will cut out at 155 degrees and cycle back on once the internal temperature drops by 25 degrees.

This part works with the following brands: Whirlpool, Admiral, Estate, Inglis, Kenmore, KitchenAid, Roper, Maytag, Crosley, Jenn-Air, Hardwick, Magic Chef, Amana, Caloric & Glenwood.

This part fixes the following symptoms:

  • No heat or not enough heat.
  • Takes too long to dry.
  • Will Not Start.
  • Timer will not advance.
  • Too hot.
  • Shuts off too soon.
  • Will not shut off.
  • Will not tumble.
  • Compare At

    $16.56
  • You Save

    $2.76
  • Your Price

    $13.80
In Stock
Fast Shipping Get this part fast. Average delivery time via regular ground: 1.8 days.

Videos For installing this part.

Related Parts Additional or alternate parts to consider.

Part PhotoPart DescriptionPriceAvailability

Thermal Fuse

Part Number 345113

This part is a one-time use thermal fuse which attaches to the blower wheel housing of your clothes dryer. It cannot be re-set and must be replaced when continuity between the pins is no longer present. Terminal size is 3/16".

$9.39
In Stock

Installation Instructions Provided by PartSelect customers like you.

Average Repair Rating: 3.7 / 5.0, 117 reviews What's this?
 

157 of 199 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
Level of Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
Time to do repair: More than 2 hours
Tools: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set
Customer: Hector from Whittier, CA

Dryer wouldn't heat

I first unplugged the electrical plug, then opened up the dryer, front and back. Once I had diagnosed the problem I unscrewed the thermal fuses and thermostat. Marked which color wire went to which connector and continued to replace one wire at a time. Re-attached the mounting screws, verified all wires were connected, plugged in dryer to test heat cycle. Once the dryer worked correctly I vacuumed all lint and covered it up.

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134 of 152 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
Level of Difficulty: Really Easy
Time to do repair: 15 - 30 mins
Tools: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
Customer: Colin from Bellingham, WA

Dryer wouldn't turn on.

When my dryer suddenly stopped functioning, without any prior signs of pending failure, I guessed that it had to be something simple, like a fuse. I did a google search and stumbled across a forum post that described the symptoms (wouldn't turn on), and the poster said that Whirlpool recommends replacing the thermostat whenever the fuse is replaced. The reason for this is that the likely cause of the fuse burning is that the thermostat is no longer properly regulating the temperature range of the heating element.

I disconnected the power source, and then I removed the back cover, and both parts were in plain view, so I simply replaced the wires one by one.

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128 of 142 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
Level of Difficulty: Really Easy
Time to do repair: 15 - 30 mins
Tools: Nutdriver
Customer: Michael from Parker, FL

Heat in dryer very low, would take an hour and half to dry a load

First I called an appliance repair place. They charged me $40 to come out and said "the air vent might be clogged". I snaked it out and really wasn't anything in there. So I started thinking it might be a thermostat. After reading the reviews that others posted here, I said, "how hard can it be"? Thanks to PartsSelect putting a diagram (schematic) of the parts, I could see what I was looking for when I removed the back panel. So I took my nutdrivers out, disconnected the vent hose and removed the 10 or so nuts off the back panel & got it out of the way. Took out the vacuum cleaner and sucked all the lint out. Removed the housing where the heating element was and marked on both thermostats and housing where each wires went. As cheap as PartsSelect had the thermostats priced, I figured why not remove the guesswork by buying the highlimit and cycling thermostats and a new heating element too. One screw in each thermostat and out they came. Swapped wires with new thermostats and put them back. With the heating element...it was all one piece, so no fighting to get the element into an old housing. Just swapped them. Put the back panel on and reconnected the vent hose. Cost to repair: about $100. Time for parts to get to me: 2 days. Time to install new parts: about 10 minutes. Knowing that I have a dryer that runs like new AND saving a TON of money on electric bill....THAT is priceless. Thanks PartsSelect!

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79 of 86 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
Level of Difficulty: Really Easy
Time to do repair: Less than 15 mins
Tools: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers
Customer: Jeffery from Plymouth, IN

Thermal fuse blown

I spent nearly an hour trying to self-diagnose the problem before I wised up and found PartSelect.com. After reading just a couple of postings I went back and tested the thermal fuse. It was bad. Other posts suggested I replace the thermostat at the same time, so I ordered both. The parts arrived within three days and the actual repair took less than 10 minutes.

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45 of 53 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
Level of Difficulty: Easy
Time to do repair: 30 - 60 mins
Tools: Nutdriver
Customer: Kent from Sebastopol, CA

No heat - everything else was functional

After 30 miutes of research on this website I felt confident to investigate the problem. Removal of the back cover is straightforward. Initially I did not appreciate and obstruction of the ductwork exitting the dryer. I bypassed the thermal fuse by removing the wires and temporarily taping them together and heat was restored. Knowing flow was OK exitting the dryer I investigated flow from the lint trap to the blower motor which is where the problem was located. In our case the lint filter was torn allowing many small objects and lint to near completely clog the pathway between the lint trap and the blower motor. It was difficult to appreaciate how obstructed that pathway was without removing the entire channel from the machine which was simple and required removing two screws at the lint trap opening followed by 3-4 screws on the back of the channel. Once removed, it was easy to appreaciate the debris clogging the channel and was easy to clean with a hose and running water. Replacement was a snap. The parts were oredered and sent in a day. I prophylactically replaced thermastats based upon a recommendation from another website. Replacing previous parts with new parts was a snap. Out the door we were up and running for around $100 (including new thermostats). The dryer repair man may go the way of the dinosaur.

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