2007711-1-S-Whirlpool-12550116Q-Freezer Door Gasket
2007711-1-S-Whirlpool-12550116Q-Freezer Door Gasket 2007711-2-S-Whirlpool-12550116Q-Freezer Door Gasket 2007711-3-S-Whirlpool-12550116Q-Freezer Door Gasket http://www.partselect.com/Schematics/Maytag/29301.gif

Freezer Door Gasket

PartSelect Number PS2007711

This door gasket is used to seal the freezer door when closed.

This part works with the following brands: Whirlpool, Admiral, Estate, Inglis, Kenmore, KitchenAid, Roper, Maytag, Crosley, Jenn-Air, Hardwick, Magic Chef, Amana, Caloric & Glenwood.

This part fixes the following symptoms:

  • Door Sweating.
  • Freezer section too warm.
  • Frost buildup.
  • Fridge runs too long.
  • Leaking.
  • Door won’t open or close.
  • Fridge too warm.
  • Freezer too cold.
  • Freezer not defrosting.
  • Compare At

    $108.54
  • You Save

    $18.09
  • Your Price

    $90.45
In Stock
Fast Shipping Get this part fast. Average delivery time via regular ground: 1.8 days.

Videos For installing this part.

Related Parts Additional or alternate parts to consider.

Part PhotoPart DescriptionPriceAvailability

Fresh Food Door Gasket

Part Number 2007709

This white gasket is used to seal the refrigerator door when closed to keep the cool air inside and the room air out.

$99.71
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Freezer Door Gasket

Part Number 2007684

This door gasket is used to make an air-tight seal for the cabinet when the door is closed.

$90.12
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Installation Instructions Provided by PartSelect customers like you.

Average Repair Rating: 3.0 / 5.0, 47 reviews What's this?
1-5 of 47
 

96 of 110 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
  • Freezer Door Gasket
Level of Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
Time to do repair: 30 - 60 mins
Tools: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
Customer: Jeffrey from Palo Alto, CA

Freezer door gasket needed replacing

Unplug refrigerator. Open freezer door. Lift the old gasket from the edge closest to the center of the door to expose the hex-head screws. Get a nut driver the appropriate size (1/4" if I remember) and loosen, but do not remove all of the screws. Once loosened, the old gasket can be removed. Slip the new gasket in just like the old one was. Lift the edges closest to the center of the door and tighten the screws. Test the fit of the new gasket by closing the door and sighting carefully down each of the four seal lines. Typically there will be spots where there are gaps, that is, the gasket is not "pulled out" enough to contact the refrigerator body. This is due to kinks that occur to the gasket during shipping. A paper that comes with the gasket notes the effect and recommends using a hair dryer to remove the kinks. Although the recommendation is to use the dryer BEFORE putting the gasket on, I used the dryer after, when I could see exactly where the gaps were. After noting the spots, open the door and with the dryer on HIGH setting, wave the hot air stream back and forth for a minute or two on each spot. Pull each spot out by hand with the hot air off and if/when the gasket is cool enough to touch but still warm. Close the door, inspect and repeat the process if necessary. I was able to achieve a good seal all the way around this way.

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36 of 40 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
Level of Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
Time to do repair: 1- 2 hours
Tools: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
Customer: david from Creve Coeur, MO

Gaskets deformed, leaking

The pro's esimate was over $500 for this one... It's very helpful to have a power tool screwdriver/nut driver. Loosen up the screws (#8 x 1/2" hex-head screws on mine) which hold the gasket in place. These screws also hold the plastic inner-portion of the refrigerator door in place. On my fridge, the parts of the gasket at the top and bottom closest to the hinge had progressively become deformed, perhaps because the outer part of the plastic was not holding the gasket in place hard enough (in these locations, I improved the clamping action by removing the screw and adding a #10 washer). In many locations, the screws turned out to have been driven in hard enough to strip the metal, so a hardware store run was needed to purchase #10 x 1/2" screws - be warned. Before trying to mount the gasket, I worked it over with a hairdryer on the floor (used an old towel to protect floor), to get out the worst of the kinks, then mounted it on the door, tucking the bead between the inner and outer door all the way around. This can be hard enough that if you do have a power tool nut driver, it may be preferable to completely remove the inner door portion, mount the gasket, then screw it back in place. Once the screws are tightened, use the hairdryer to soften the areas which don't contact properly, working on the gasket with your fingers and/or by repeatedly opening and closing the door, until you have smooth contact all the way around. I did not remove the doors completely, simply stowed the freezer compartment stuff in an ice chest, and used cardboard to close the main refrigerator compartment.

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19 of 21 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
  • Freezer Door Gasket
Level of Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
Time to do repair: More than 2 hours
Tools: Nutdriver, Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench set
Customer: David from Emporia, KS

Ice building around door and on mullions, gasket deformed

Other stories I've read here speak to difficulty of changing a gasket with the door on the appliance. Whoa! Take the door off, tape cardboard over the opening, lay the door on its back and proceed. You will avoid racking or twisting the door and having the new gasket fit worse than the old. You can also thaw ice which often forms inside a door over time. Reinstall the door taking pains to shim properly so the new gasket is not overcompressed or allowing a gap. A dollar bill is a good gauge. It should resist a bit as it is pulled out after closing the door on it. This was not exactly step-by-step, just offered as advice from a whole bunch of experience.

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14 of 16 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
Level of Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
Time to do repair: 1- 2 hours
Tools: Socket set
Customer: Kay from Nashville, IN

The gasket was worn and the freezer door had a poor seal.

I removed all the food items from the door. I removed the old gasket by loosening up the screws at the top of the door. The rest of the old gasket pulled out easily from the rest of the door. While the gasket was off, I took the time to clean up the door. I startede at the top of the door, loosening up the screws but not removing them. I then replaced each side of the door seperately. I found it helpful to have a flat blade to help poke the gasket into place. Because I was in the kitchen, I used a metal spatula. The corners were the trickiest. Using a hand held hair dryer helped to soften the gasket when it became cold. The freezer and fridge have good seals now and the refrigerator is good as new.

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8 of 8 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used:
  • Freezer Door Gasket
Level of Difficulty: Easy
Time to do repair: 30 - 60 mins
Tools: Nutdriver
Customer: Daniel from Toledo, OH

Torn freezer door gasket

First I removed all the screws with the exception of the top row, these I just loosend.I made sure how the old one was installed before I removed it.I then used a hair dryer on the new one briefly to take out the shipping kinks.I removed the old one and put the new one in with a little adjusting as i went. I then put all the screws back in,adjusted it a little more and finished by snuging up all the screws.It was very easy and works like new.

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