Direct Drive Motor Coupling

PartSelect Number PS1485646

Manufacturer Part Number 285753A
Manufactured by Whirlpool

This coupling kit is used between the motor and the transmission on direct drive washers with no belt. This is the newer version and is made with new metal sleeves for added strength.

This part works with the following brands: Whirlpool, Admiral, Estate, Inglis, Kenmore, KitchenAid, Roper, Maytag, Crosley, Jenn-Air, Hardwick, Magic Chef, Amana, Caloric & Glenwood.

This part fixes the following symptoms:

  • Pumps but will not spin.
  • Will not agitate.
  • Noisy.
  • Will not drain.
  • Spins slowly.
  • Burning smell.
  • Will Not Start.
  • Shakes and moves.
  • Leaking.
  • Touchpad does not respond.
  • Compare At

    $11.89
  • You Save

    $1.98
  • Your Price

    $9.91
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Installation Instructions Provided by PartSelect customers like you.

Average Repair Rating: 3.2 / 5.0, 214 reviews What's this?
 

61 of 70 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used

  • Direct Drive Motor Coupling

Level of DifficultyReally Easy

Time to do repair:15 - 30 mins

ToolsScrew drivers, Socket set

CustomerRoger from Swainsboro, GA

Wouldn't agitate or spin.

First, I removed two screws holding the bottom fiberboard panel in place, and the panel, to gain access to the motor, transmission, and pump. Unfortunately, I had the machine tilted to the front, and didn't have room to release the pump. I had to set the machine back up, and get manuvered around so I could lay it on it's back (I was working in the confines of a small laundry room). Once on it's back, I released the two clips holding the pump with a flat head screwdriver, lifted it up and out of the way without having to disconnect any of the piping, then I released the two clips holding the motor, again with a flathead screwdriver, disconnected the wiring plugs, and capacitor wires, then lifted the motor up and out of the machine. I then removed the two bolts holding the motor mounting plate to the transmission. Then, again using a large flat head screwdriver, I pried the transmission coupling half off the transmission shaft, I had to work it up, while turning the shaft, and then the same for the motor half. I then wiped off both shafts, and gently tapped both coupling halves back onto the shafts,
( this is easier using a socket that is just large enough to go over the shafts). Then I reinstalled the motor mounting plate, slipped the rubber coupling onto the transmission coupling half, lifted the motor into place, and rotated from the pump end to line up with the remaining holes on the rubber coupling. I then reinstalled the clips used to hold the motor in place, reinstallation only took thumb pressure to snap back into place, then, I reinstalled the pump, using the same method, and reconnected the wiring plugs and copacitor leads. Lastly, I reinstalled the fiberboard panel into the bottom, and set the machine upright, slid back into place, and reconnected the hoses and electrical, and tested the machine. Worked perfectly.
In actually took longer to disconnect the machine, and get it out and back in, than it did to replace the coupling.

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Parts Used

Level of DifficultyEasy

Time to do repair:1- 2 hours

ToolsNutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set

CustomerRon from bellbrook, OH

Would not completely spin all the water out of clothes

I replaced the clutch and coupler. The clutch was well worn. My wife had washed three or four loads of heavy rugs and we think that was the cause of the premature wear. We now take the rugs to a commercial laundry. The coupler was OK but the new coupler has metal instead of plastic inserts so I decided to replace it while I had it torn apart. The machine is now running like it was new.

0.Disconnect supply hoses and electrical. Refer to the parts breakdown pictures on the PartSelect website. I refer to only the numbers so you may have to match the part to a particular diagram.
1. Remove the agitator by pulling up on the fabric softener dispenser #1. Clean out the excess liquid and "residual gunk". Grab one off the tabs of the plastic cap #23 and pull gently. The plastic cap (~ 3" in dia) is held in place by a rubber O-ring #24. The cap comes out easily exposing the bolt that holds the agitator to the drive shaft. Remove the bolt. and the agitator comes right out.
2. Turn the machine over on its front. You do not need to remove the back panel.
3. Get plenty of rags to soak up the water before you remove the hoses from the water pump #22 on the end of the motor. A quart or more remains in the pump and hoses. Remove the two hoses.
4. Disconnect the wiring harness from the motor#29. There is a small plastic "catch" on the bottom of the connector that must be lifted to remove the connector. It's kind of hard to see but it's there and it's part of the connector.
5. Remove the three bolts #10 that hold the gearcase #9 to the bottom of the tub assembly.
6. Remove the gearcase, the drive shaft, the motor, and the water pump as one unit. You will need to lift them a little to get clearance because the tub has settled down. Just lift the tub and all and pull the assembly out. Get them out to a spot where you have room to work on them. The water pump may still have bit of water.
7. Replacing the clutch. Remove the clutch parts from the bag and lay them out where you can see everything. Refer to the instructions in the bag to select the correct spring and to see how the keeper spring is installed. Remove the washer, keeper ring, and clutch assembly, and plastic clip#15 remembering the order and the orientation. Install the new clutch in reverse order.
8. You will have one plastic part #15 left over. It goes on the bottom of the tub after you remove a key ring.
9. Replacing the coupler. note the orientation of the water pump#22 and remove it by removing the two retainers #21. set it aside.
10. Remove the screws#23 and retainer clips#17. Separate the motor#20 from the gearcase#9 to expose the coupler. Replace the coupler, reattach the motor to the gearcase, and the water pump to the motor.
11. The reassembly is pretty much a reverse of the assembly.

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35 of 39 people found this instruction helpful

Parts Used

  • Direct Drive Motor Coupling

Level of DifficultyEasy

Time to do repair:1- 2 hours

ToolsPliers, Screw drivers, Socket set

CustomerPaul from Boonton, NJ

Washer wouldn't spin or agitate. Made louder-than-usual noise during those cycles.

1. Read many other repair stories for similar symptoms. PartSelect Forum was an excellent resource.

2. Posted my problem on PartSelect Forum and awaited reply. Read replies, and followed provided link to step-by-step guide for the procedure. PartSelect forum moderators were excellent advisors!

3. Performed the first half of the procedure to get to the diagnosed root cause. In some of the stories I had read, people had turned the washer on its back or tilted it up to get at the area from underneath. I am so glad I followed the conventional instructions, and left the washer standing and simply removed the cabinet. It was surprisingly easy. There's a reason why it was designed that way. I am also glad that I chose to remove the pump from the motor. While it is true that you don't *have* to remove the pump from the motor to get at the coupling...it hardly seems to make sense to remove the hoses instead. Removing the pump was incredibly easy, and by doing so, I never had to break any "wet" connections, and not one drop of water spilled over the course of the entire repair. (Even though I forgot to shut the water supply valves before I got started. Ooops! At least I remembered to unplug the power cord.)

4. But despite the open valves, the galoshes came into play not for their ability to repel water, but for their value as an electric insulator. I wrapped the galoshes around the handle of a long screwdriver when I discharged the motor's capacitor. :)

5. Ordered parts. Washed clothes in sink. Waited. Washed more clothes in sink. Waited some more. Washed more clothes in sink. Waited still more. Came very close to stopping payment to PartSelect because the very simple, commonly-requested part I ordered, which was supposedly in stock on the day I ordered it, didn't ship until the day it was supposed to arrive--even though I paid extra for expedited shipping. And I was never sent an e-mail to warn me that the parts were going to be delayed. And then to top it all off, rather than make up for some of the lost time caused by their own error, and ship it overnight, PartSelect chose to ship it 2nd day. All that good will generated by the excellent website completely evaporated by the failure to correctly complete the simple tasks that the business has needed to be good at since before computers were even invented. I will never use PartSelect again.

6. Prying the old coupler halves off of the motor and the washer took some effort, but was not overly difficult. I wound up removing the motor mounting plate in order to get better access to the half that was stuck on / needed to be attached to the drive train of the washing machine. Mounting plate was a breeze to remove and attach with a socket driver. I used one of those stubby flat-head screwdrivers to pry the old parts off. This was the one time where I thought it might have been easier to have the washing machine tilted up or on its back...but I muddled on through without even removing the bottom panel, and it wasn't too awkward. I used a large socket and a full-size hammer to not-so-gently tap the new parts into place. Putting all of the parts back together took a bit longer than it took to break them down, but it was easy. The instructions for putting the electronic control panel into test mode had been rolled up and taped to the cabinet inside the top panel. After I put the cabinet back on, I used those instructions to test all the cycles before fastening the top panel and testing the machine with an actual load. So far, so good...

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Parts Used

Level of DifficultyReally Easy

Time to do repair:30 - 60 mins

ToolsNutdriver, Screw drivers, Socket set

CustomerMichael from Schuylkill Haen, PA

Washer would drain, agitate but not spin and was very noisy and would vibrate heavily

I first watched the youTube vidio on yhe PartSelect web site. After getting a visual of the repair, I decided to tackle the job with a better understanding and knew the repair was easy to purform. First I took the two screws out of the contrl panel on top of the washer, rolled the panel back to expose the clips that hold the metal cabinet to the back panel of the washer. After removing the cabinet I was ready to lay the washer on it's back and had a clear view of the pump, motor and clutch... I was able to easly identify these parts because I took time to watch the video. Using a flat head screwdriver I removed the clips that hold the pump to the motor... Without disconnecting the hoses connected to the pump I pushed the pump to the side and out of the way. This further exposed the motor. Using the flat head screwdriver, I removed the clips holding the motor to the transmission (they just snap off like they did on the pump). The motor was now ready to be removed from the transmission ( it just lifts off) before removing it I disconnected the power suply wire from the motor... Now the motor can be completely removed. I identified the drive couupler 1/2 was on the motor shaft the other 1/2 was on the transmission shaft.. On both halfs the splines were broken. I removed the old broken drive coupler. Since I already had the machine so far apart i figured i would replace the clutch also. Using a deep socket ratchet wit an extention I removed the agator... I then unbolted the transmission (only three bolts) I gentely pulled the transmission and shaft out of the bottom of the washer. This exposed the clutc assembly, I removed the clutc ( which wasn't bad or wore by the way) and replaced it.... I figured I had it and I was this far into the repair why not. After relpasingvthe clutch, I slid the shaft and transmission back into place tightened the bolts and that was done. I then slid/replaced the drive coupler... Placing one half on the motor shaft the other on the transmission shaft, placed the rubber bushing on the oneside of the plastic drive coupler. And mounted the motor back on the transmission utilizing the clips I took off earlier. Once the motor was in place I installed the waterpump fastened by the clips. Flipped yhe washer up, replaced the cabinet... Tightened down the the control panel and was ready to do some wash..: the washer runs perfect now and I saved myself about $700.00. It was allot easier than I thought it would be... Watching the youTube video is the secret to success. The washer is running like the day I bought it new... All for only 53.00. Hats off to everyone at PartsSelect for going above and beyond. Regards, ~ Michael

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Parts Used

  • Direct Drive Motor Coupling

Level of DifficultyA Bit Difficult

Time to do repair:30 - 60 mins

ToolsScrew drivers, Wrench (Adjustable)

CustomerTed from SOUTH MILWAUKEE, WI

Washer would fill/empty but would not agitate nor spin

Unplugged power cord and disconnected water lines; note which is hot/cold. Washer was then tipped on its front. Discharge hose was disconnected. Washer was then rolled over onto its back as this would put the pump on top for much easier removal.

Pried off two clips attaching pump on motor using a flathead screwdriver. The rear clip was done by touch. Unplugged wiring plug from motor. Using an adjustable wrench (socket set would have worked better), remove two screws holding 2nd set of clips attaching motor on transmission. Then pried off clips.

Removed old coupling from transmission shaft and motor shaft, plus middle 6 hole widget thingy.

Installed new parts on transmission shaft and motor shaft with fingers pointing towards each other. Using a small hammer, tapped the parts onto each shaft. Placed 6 hole widget thingy on the transmission part, and then rotated motor so motor part would fit in remaining three holes.

Replaced clips to hold motor on transmission and reinstalled screws holding clips.

IMPORTANT: Replace motor wire now. I forgot to do this and after the tub was filled with water, realized that, and since the pump was also disconnected, could not get the water out. Had to get wife to hold washer up while I crawled underneath to reattach motor wire. Learn from my mistake!

Attach pump onto motor and replace clips. Double check everything is back in place.

Roll washer onto front side. Attach discharge hose. Tip washer back upright. Reconnect water. Reposition discharge hose and plug washer into power.

First try it smelled like something plastic was burning, but I think that was the old part shavings getting ground away.

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