Models > MGR6875ADS > Instructions

MGR6875ADS Maytag Range - Instructions

All installation instructions for MGR6875ADS parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the range repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the MGR6875ADS
1-15 of 117
Search Instructions
Keep searches simple, eg. "belt" or "pump". Need help?

F1 code - gas over would not heat.

  • Customer: george from birmingham AL
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 70 of 78 people found this instruction helpful
Repair tech checked oven and said the control panel was bad and needed to be replaced. The new control panel would cost over $450.00! I found that the oven sensor was bad and replaced it for $30.00. The old oven sensor had failed following a self cleaning cycle. I found that the wires coming out of it were burnt.

Replacing the oven sensor was very easy. I removed the back panels 6 screws to gain access to the sensor's connection. I then removed the 2 screw that hold the sensor in place inside the oven and pulled the old sensor out through the oven. I reversed this process to place the new sensor in the oven.

Ignitor was bad on upper oven

  • Customer: David from Temple Terrace FL
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 28 of 32 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the lower tray and all parts covering the ignitor on the upper oven. 2. Then I removed the screws holding down the ignitor and flame distributor. 3. I then had to pull out the oven from the wall and remove the back panel to expose the wires connecting the ignitor. This required the removal of about six screws but they were fairly easy to get to. 4. I disconnected the ignitor from the back panel then went around to the front of the oven and pulled out the ignitor and all of the attached parts. 5. Here's the tricky part. The screws holding the ignitor in place had fused from the heat and then the threads stripped when I tried to remove them. I had to use a dremel tool and cutting wheel to carefully cut the screws off and then went to buy some replacement screws from the hardware store. 6. I replaced them with a nut and a bolt, to hopefully avoid the same problem for later replacement if necessary. 7. I then replaced everything the same way it came out and all is working like new!

Oven Door Inner Glass Broken

  • Customer: Shariq from West Conshohocken PA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 21 of 22 people found this instruction helpful
This is fairly easy for anyone to do. First I opened up the front (silver part) of the oven door by removing the screws at the top and the bottom. Then I kept on removing the various layers of glass... the 2 outside ones are removed by removing their respective screws and then you get to the inner-most. These 2 inner ones are in a frame that holds them together. I removed the large silver frame that holds the insulation and the 2-glass-frame in it. Just remove the screws and then tilt the insulation frame out a bit to remove the glass frame. You can tilt the entire insulation holder out but the insulation is soft and it starts to fall off. Just tilting it enough worked for me. Then I opened up the glass frame from one end, removed the left-over broken piece of the old glass pane and installed the new one in. Then reassemble. The entire process is very easy - but you will need another person for a few minutes when you remove /reinstall the glass frame inside the insulation holder. You would just need a little help holding everything... nothing technical. I would rate the repair technicality at 4 or 5/10. It could even be a 3 if there were less steps involved. Good luck! By the way, Amana/Maytag wanted $70 or so for the glass and then the repair fee. I got the part here for about $50.

spark igniter was weak and not lighting the flame.

  • Customer: Daniel from Needham MA
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers, Wrench set, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 18 of 22 people found this instruction helpful
Open top oven door and remove the 2 front screws which hold the burners and controls to the frame. DO NOT lift the burners more than an inch or so to look inside. You WILL bend the gas lines in the back if you do. Pull out stove from the wall, shut off gas supply and disconnect hose if needed to have room to work. Remove top back panel and remove the 3 wires connecting the top burner assembly and also remove the 2 gas lines. Now you will be able to remove the burner assembly safely. Flip it over and try to unscrew the screw holding the igniter. When you fail, drill it out and get a small metal screw to replace it. The metal is soft and the screw is hard, so drill carefully. The rest is easy, put in the new igniter and screw. and put it back together.

Needed to replace oven door gasket.

  • Customer: Lori from Scottsdale AZ
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers
  • 19 of 26 people found this instruction helpful
First removed the old gasket using a needle-nose pliers. Then placed new gasket by inserting the little clips on the gasket. Took 5 minutes. Great instructions from Repair Forum.

Oven rack lost in a garage fire

  • Customer: Bob from Saint Clair Shores MI
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 16 of 19 people found this instruction helpful
First I opened the door to the oven. Then I opened the box that the part came in. (knife) I then slid the oven rack out of the box and unwrapped the plastic, being careful not to bend or scratch the new rack. Now, this is the tricky part... I had to move the existing rack down one space to make room for the new one. Then carefully slid the new rack in, tipping it slightly and sliding it in. LOL

Oven would not heat- Beeped nonstop and flashed F3

  • Customer: Erin from Greenwich CT
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 14 of 14 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed two screws that hold the oven sensor in place. I then removed the screws that held the panel on the back of the oven. I simply unclipped the plastic adaptor and replaced the old sensor with the new one. I screwed the sensor back in and put the back panel on. turned the power back on to the oven and hit the bake button. Voila!! The oven turned on and now it works like new!!!

Oven would not heat

  • Customer: Timothy from Elkhorn WI
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 14 of 16 people found this instruction helpful
Lifted door off hinges; removed lower oven spill plate; unmounted bake igniter from heat shield; pulled stove away from wall; removed rear access panels (4 screws); unplugged bake igniter; installed new part; vacuumed behind stove and mopped floor (this took more time than installing the part); oven is back in cookie baking mode!

Burned terminal block and filter board

  • Customer: Joseph from Decatur GA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench set
  • 27 of 57 people found this instruction helpful
Removed and replaced above named parts, rewired.Be sure to tighten all nuts that secure wires. I believe this is what caused the problem.

Ignitor on main burner would not create a spark

  • Customer: Michael from Bloomington IL
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 16 of 24 people found this instruction helpful
Having no manual nor finding any instructions online, I spent a while trying to figure out how to safely get to the ignitor mounting screw under the range top. I popped the snap clips on either side of the stove to loosen the top and pulled the top up a few inches to see why it was being difficult to raise. It turns out that the gas piping was solidly attached from the controls to the burners and I was slightly bending the tubes as the top was raised. The tubes have angles and curves to "accept" the bending pressure I was applying, so it looked like I was doing the right thing. In case I was not doing the right thing, however, I raised the top only enough to get access to the ignitor base and mounting screw. Then the fun began as the screw would not loosen. After several attempts using liquid wrench, tapping on it, etc., the screw head finally just broke off. Uh-ohhhh. Not to worry, however, as there was an empty mounting hole right next to the old one that appeared to be able to work. The mounting screw for the new ignitor was backordered, so I tried a couple dozen different screws I had in my toolkit and finally found one that would fit width-wise, but I had to nip off some of the length to get it to seat properly. The replacement ignitor also had a different width blade connector than the original so I had to grind away some of its width to reattach it to the lead wire. If I had a different sized blade receiver, I would have instead replaced the receiver on the end of the lead wire. It took about 90 minutes in all.

oven door inner glass pane broke

  • Customer: Kimberly from Ascutney VT
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 11 of 11 people found this instruction helpful
removed oven door, removed screws from bottom and sided, door is in layers, removed door layers like taking apart a sanwhich layer by layer, once i got to the inner layer i just had to bend out the little tab on the frame,remove the broken pane and place in the new one, bend the tab back and then put the door back together layer by layer, it was very easy and saved me money, and frustration in dealing with a repair man from a well known company who tried to tell me I needed to replace the whole door as the glass was factory sealed in the door, WELL! this girl's hair may be blonde but not that blonde, I received the glass the very next day, and it took me 40 minutes tops to replace the glass, EASY! KC

Oven would not light -- gas smell

  • Customer: Mark from Rockwall TX
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 11 of 12 people found this instruction helpful
Remove racks and pull out stove from wall. Remove back cover from stove. Unscrew and unplug sensor. Rethread new sensor wire through hole and plug in new sensor and rescrew plate that holds in place.

We had complications because of how the stove was installed, which delayed the "fix" time considerably.

Also installed ignitor. It was determined that both were bad. Gas would come on but not light. When oven would light, it would not re-light periodically to keep the temperature up, causing gas smell. This added time to repair of an additional 1 hour, and required removal of bottom drawer.

Overshooting temperatures upon changing settings

  • Customer: James from Palmdale CA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 11 of 12 people found this instruction helpful
Look in the oven. On the upper left corner is the sensor. Remove two screws. Gently pull the wire and connector through the hole and insulation. Disconnect old sensor, replace new. Gently push the connection through, then finish pulling through from behind the stove. Replace the screws inside the oven. Done.

oven temperature not correct

  • Customer: Wayne from Hopedale IL
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 9 of 9 people found this instruction helpful
Pulled the oven away from wall to access rear of oven. Disconnect electric plug from duplex outlet, turn off gas supply ball valve. Removed two screws that retain sensor on inside of oven. Disconnected two prong sensor connector at rear of oven. Tied a length of string to sensor connector wires. Pulled old sensor out through front of oven. Use the string to tie onto new sensor connector wires and pull new sensor into place from rear of oven. Retain sensor with two screws. At back of oven, used connector jumper supplied with part package to make connection to existing connector.

Kept getting F3 errors

  • Customer: Daniel from Long Beach CA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 9 of 10 people found this instruction helpful
My oven stopped working and the display read F3 error. I looked up the code and found that it was probably the thermostat sensor. I ordered the part from partselect.com and when it arrived I went to install it but I ran into a somewhat scary issue. I found that I had to pull my oven out of the wall in order to replace the sensor.

After a minor nervous breakdown, I decided to go for it and found that it was much easier than I had imagined. Changing the sensor involves taking out the two screws that hold the sensor in place (inside of the oven), pulling it out to the point you can reach the connector, plugging in the new sensor and screwing it back in place. However, if you have an oven like my model, you have to pull out the whole oven from the wall in order to reach the plug on the sensor. This sounds like a lot of trouble but for me it was very easy. The oven is held in place with screws around the front side. Most are easily accessed and you don't have to take out any critical/complicated pieces of the oven. My screw gun made short issue of the problem and I found that the oven was out of the wall within minutes. I could then easily unscrew a small back cover, change the sensor and then screw the oven back into the wall. Being very careful, the whole operation took about 20 minutes. I recommend that you get help from a friend just because the oven is bulky. It is not heavy, an average sized male can handle the weight but it’s easier with a friend. Also, be careful that the gas hose which feeds the oven is long enough (and not tangled) for you to move the oven out of its space. Obviously, be careful about gas leaks.
All Instructions for the MGR6875ADS
1-15 of 117