Models > LW7503W2 (PLW7503W2 A) > Instructions

LW7503W2 (PLW7503W2 A) Amana Washer - Instructions

All installation instructions for LW7503W2 parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the washer repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the LW7503W2
106-113 of 113
Search Instructions
Keep searches simple, eg. "belt" or "pump". Need help?

Washing machine was making a banging noise

  • Customer: Paul from East Berlin PA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Turned off water & unpluged ac power. Removed 2 screws on front panel. Removed panel. Found peices of V belt. Removed 4 screws from electric motor which allowed the belt to come out. Ordered new belt on line. Received the item in one day. Reversed the above sequence above. Now the washer is running as good as new.

Hub bearing needed replacing

  • Customer: Mark from Chesterfield MO
  • Difficulty: Difficult
  • Time to Complete: More than 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set, Wrench set, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
My Amana washing machine burned up a second belt in about three weeks. Prior to that, the spin cycle was very loud. Online research revealed the problem was most likely the hub bearing. I ordered a new bearing, belt and hub and seal kit. The repair is a difficult one as the parts have been on the tranmission shaft many years with the mounting corrosion and mineral build up. I was able to pull the agitator off with no problem. The drive bell would have been easier to pull had I used a gear puller but did not own one. I use two crow bars to lift it off the shaft and I knew I'd be replacing it anyway so was not concerned about damaging it although I didn't. The most difficult part to remove was the large hex nut. I didn't want to purchase the tool to remove it so I used an open end adjustable wrench adn a hammer to remove it. However it took many hours of soaking the nut in sprayed on WD-40 to loosen it. For a while I thought it wasn't going to budge. Oh and btw, the nut comes off counterclockwise on this model. This is important. Other makes of washers have left handed threads, requiring clockwise removal, but this one does not. The hub assembly was pulled using the crow bar method. Again, it was going to be replaced anyway. The lint filter was cleaned and reused. The remainder of the dissassembly went OK using the directions in the repair manual. http://www.scribd.com/doc/8677902/Amana-Top-Load-Washer-Service-Manual. Reassembly went fine using the repair manual accept that the new drive bell was much more difficult to drive onto the shaft than I thought it would be. I eventually got it on using my shop vac rigid tube to go around it and hammering on a block of wood placed on top of it. I also used this shop vac tube to seat the seal that goes on the shaft just before the drive bell. It was the perfect tool for it as I wasn't going to purchase the special tool suggested in the repair manual. I'd already purchased $185 in parts. The kits come with grease but not the anti seizure compound or the industrial sealant needed. The anti seisure compound can be purchased from an auto parts store. It's not expensive. The industrial sealant is expensive. After researching what it was and why it was needed, I took a chance on silicone sealant. I'm not suggesting it is a good substitute but my washer has not leaked after 5 loads. Plus the sealant is really a backup to the main seal that goes on the transmission shaft before the hub assembly. But I'm pleased overall with the parts and accompanying directions and the washer is working great, spinning quietly. This is not an easy repair. It takes patience and a place to work on it. Frankly, with other things to do as well as go to work, it took me four days to complete, mostly due to the difficulty in removing the large hex nut. It might be worth investing in the removal tool if you're unsuccessful using home tools. Good luck.

The pump housing had a large crack in it

  • Customer: John from Washington PA
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
The hardest part was removing the tub from washer by myself. I simply removed the bolts holding the sides to the bottom of the unit and lifted it straight off. Be careful when you remove the springs from the drum so they don't spring back and puncture the drain line. Thank you RTV gasket maker. Once the drum was free from the base, i tilted the drum back exposing the pump housing. I used a pair of pliers to remove both drain lines then removed the 3 hex screws freeing the pump. I had no problem removing it from the motor shaft, it slipped right off. I put everything back together as easily as it came apart.

The old water inlet valve was stripped.

  • Customer: Barbara from Pflugerville TX
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Removed the back plate. Disconnected the inside water hose. Unplugged the electrical contacts. Pulled out the old valve, connected the water hoses to the valve, plugged in the electrical contacts, reconnected the inside water hose, and put the plate back on the washer. The hardest part was putting the plate back on the washer. This entire repair would have been exceptionally easy except that I had to sit on top of the washer and hang upside down to do the repair due to the extremely small space the washer was in.

Water pumped in very slowly.

  • Customer: Stephanie from Lawrence KS
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Unplugged washer, turned water valves off, disconnected water lines from washer with adjustable channel-lock wrench. Water inlet valve was mounted on its own plate that needed removed using a screw driver. Disconnected the electric sensors and disconnected the outlet hose. Valve had to be taken off the mounting plate with a nutdriver. Replaced valve and reconnected everything. Water pumped in 10 times faster.

Leaking pump

  • Customer: Bryan from Huntsville AL
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Disconnected wire harness. Loosened belt by slipping off main pulley. Removed motor/pump assembly (easy so far). Had some difficulty separating pump off motor shaft. Shaft had rusted into the plastic pump socket. Cleaned shaft with sandpaper. Reassembly with new belt and pump was easy.

washer leaking from bottom of tub

  • Customer: Jaime from Hamburg NY
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: More than 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Socket set
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Removed the tub from outer shell/washer body completely. This made it easier to work. Removed the agitater by pulling upward. Used gear puller to remove bell housing and bell seal exposing the 1-1/2" nut holding down the hub. I remove the stainless steel tub liner exposing the hub assembly. Used the an impact wrench and 1-1/2" deep well socket to remove nut. Used the gear pullers to remove the hub assembly. It crumbled as I tried to remove it, so I used a dremel tool cutter and began cutting it apart. Removed the pieces with a chisel and rubber mallet. When the hub was finally removed' it was easy to remove hub seal and replace. Make sure everything is cleaned up, smoothed and lubricated before reassembly. I also replaced drive belt and pump. It was easy with outer shell completely removed. The washer went back together according to directions. Allow seal glue to set overnight and found there were no leaks.

fan belt was broken

  • Customer: Daniel from Oreland PA
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Socket set
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
First thing I did was to read the great information from other customers. John from Milton's post titled "frayed v belt" was excellent; so was Joseph from Goldsboro NC under the Pump part posts. I would add the following info which wasn't readily available. The Torx/starbit size mentioned in the posts referenced is a T25 the Amana lw8203w2 I have. I bought a t25 size torx wrench at my local hardware store for $2. I got everything together --the belt took some arm strength for an amateur like me to get on. Also, would recommend gloves as some of the edges are sharp down there. Everything appeared okay and when I started the spin cycle it started then cut off. I thought maybe besides the fan belt there was electronics faulty. However, I found an amana repair guide for my model online at scribd and under the troubleshooting section, it described the cutout of the spin cycle and if the new fan belt is too tight, it will bind and the spin cycle will cut out. So I opened up the front again and worked the belt for several turns to "stretch it" and voila, it worked perfectly.
All Instructions for the LW7503W2
106-113 of 113