Models > JKP27G*J4 > Instructions

JKP27G*J4 General Electric Range - Instructions

All installation instructions for JKP27G*J4 parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the range repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the JKP27G*J4
1-15 of 590
Search Instructions
Keep searches simple, eg. "belt" or "pump". Need help?

oven lower burner burned out

  • Customer: james from franklin TN
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 373 of 374 people found this instruction helpful
Very easy, remove two screws, pull burner unit out slightly, then remove the two screws attaching the wires, one to each side, remove old unit and replace with new unit and replace screws.

Works fine perfect replacement.

Bottom heating element went out

  • Customer: Michael from Saint Paris OH
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 358 of 361 people found this instruction helpful
This repair took between 15 and 30 minutes BUT ONLY because my 10 year old son did the repair. He couldn't wait for his father to come home from work. His only complaint was the tight fit to reach the back of the oven (he wanted to take the oven door off but I said no). He removed the 2 screws that held the element in place and then pulled it from the oven until he could remove the screws that held the wires in place. He was concerned that a little of the insulation came out with the wires, but this was no issue. The new element hooked right up (we figured out that we had to use the 2 new screws for the wires because the old ones did not fit very well). We used the same 'old' screws to attach the element back to the oven. Plugged the oven back in and it works fine. My son was so proud and I didn't have to help any more than shining a flashlight for him.

Oven heating element was broken.

  • Customer: Phyllis from Fisk MO
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Socket set
  • 251 of 324 people found this instruction helpful
The heating element in the lower oven of my 18 year-old GE double oven broke into two pieces and would not heat. Because of the age of the oven, a replacement part was unavailable through GE. I came across PartSelect.com through an Internet search and ordered the part online. Total cost was $33.50, counting s/h. FedEx delivered the new element less than 48 hours after I placed the order online.

IMPORTANT: FLIP the BREAKER to stop electricity from going to the oven. Replacing the heating element is a two step process: 1. Remove the old element. 2. Install the new element in its place. (NOTE: This job is much simpler if you lift and remove the oven door BEFORE you begin. NOTE also: There are no slots in the screws, so you must use a small socket wrench--not a screwdriver-- to remove the screws.) STEP 1: Two screws go through the small metal plate attached to the element prongs. These screws hold the element to the back oven wall. Remove the screws, then pull the element forward a few inches to gain access to two screws which hold the element prongs to wires that come through the back oven wall. (One wire and one screw for each of the two prongs.) Remove the two screws. Remove and discard the old element. STEP 2: Install the new element by doing Step 1 in reverse. Oven is now repaired! (It took more time to type these instruction than it took to repair the oven.)

Bake element was on its last legs, starting to crack but still functional.

  • Customer: Lawrence from San Jose CA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 126 of 192 people found this instruction helpful
Removed the racks, unscrewed the back plate which holds the element, unscrewed the leads from the element, removed the old part.

Reversed the process to install the new element.

Turned the oven on for a few minutes to burn any contaminates off the new element, replaced the racks.

And that was it; quite easy.

The oven element had broken in half and was sparking

  • Customer: Brittany from Cayce SC
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers
  • 112 of 175 people found this instruction helpful
I am not a handy person so I was really nervous about doing this. I first unplugged the oven just to be on the safe side. Then I removed the two screws that hold the element in place. Next I pulled the element forward and disconnected the two wires. After that I simply reconnected the two wires to the new element, pushed it back in and put the screws in. Piece of cake!

Lower back element had burned out with a piece melted out of it.

  • Customer: Gregory from Peabody MA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Socket set
  • 75 of 77 people found this instruction helpful
First I opened the shipping box that the new part came in and figured out which tools I would need. Then I went down to the cellar and clicked off the breaker that supplied power to the oven. In this case, it was the only 50 amp breaker in the panel so It was easy to figure out.
Then I hung a drop light inside the oven so I could see clearly and used a quarter inch drive ratchet with a quarter inch sized socket to remove the two self tapping screws that hold the element plate to the back of the oven. Then I used the same sized socket to remove the small screws that hold the wires and terminal ends to the element contacts.
Then I removed the old unit, placed the new one inside and reversed my steps till the new elements leads and bracket were both securely in place and the element supports were resting on the bottom of the oven. I then turned the power back on and set the oven for 350 degrees and switched the 'bake' selector on. Within thirty seconds, I had a nice even heating new element that glowed brightly from one end to the other. Success! Piece of cake. In the future, I plan to get all my appliance parts at PartsSelect.com and do a lot more repairs myself instead of just replacing the entire appliance.

Greg G. - Peabody, Massachusetts

bottom heating element burned out

  • Customer: Tony from Rancho Cordova CA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 92 of 157 people found this instruction helpful
I shut off the power at the breaker. Then I checked that the power was off by turning on the stove. Light did not come on, power is off. [ By the way, I locked the breaker box, in case somebody helpful came along to turn the power back on !] Then I undid the screws holding the old element . Pulled it out, and undid the screws holding the wire leads to the element. Screwed wire leads to new element. Pushed back in, and screwed brace screws back in. Went out to breaker box and turned power back on. Turned on oven. Worked. Second time I've done this. I kind of forgot how, since the last time was about 6 years ago, but anyone could figure this out, unless they didn't want to. Took 20 minutes. A little hard working in a small space , but beats buying a new stove.

oven would no longer heat. Only broiler worked

  • Customer: Liz from Williamson NY
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Socket set
  • 90 of 152 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the 2 screws that held the bake element in place. Then I pulled the element out and disconnected the two wires. Reconnected the two wires to the new element and pushed it back in place and installed the unit again with the 2 screws. Turned the oven on and it heated up like it should.

Needed to replace cracked bake & broil element

  • Customer: Harry from Rancho Santa Margarita CA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Socket set
  • 88 of 151 people found this instruction helpful
This repair is very simple and only required about 15-20 minutes per unit. After turning off the power to your oven at the main breaker box, it's just a matter of removing two 1/4" screws and pulling out the units. The tricky part is removing the power plugs to the elements and not letting them slip back into the insulation. Once you plug in the new elements and screw them back in you are good to go. Once note, while you have everything out, it is a great opportunity to give your oven a good cleaning.

Electronic Timer went out and Top Oven No Longer worked

  • Customer: David from Owings Mills MD
  • Difficulty: Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 29 of 37 people found this instruction helpful
There are about 12 wires behind the panel...and this was the second time I've replaced the electronic clock in the past four years. I replaced the analog clock four years ago with the digital version because the analog was no longer available, so I knew what I was in for. There are four screw (top of the frame and lower frame) to remove before the frame holding the clock will come out. First DISCONNECT the power! You've have to remove the clock control knobs, and the plastic lever on the self cleaning handle. The first time I ordered this replacement part from PartsSelect there was a diagram included on which wire goes where. This time there wasn't! So it gets a little complicated. Make sure you label all the wired before you disconnect the old clock panel. Anyway, remove the four nuts holding the old clock in place; put the new clock panel in; replace the four nuts. I'll be glad to talk anyone through the rest and I have photos of the whole repair.

bake element bent down to bottom of oven (ready to break)

  • Customer: James from Tazewell VA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 22 of 26 people found this instruction helpful
1) turned off breaker to oven
2) removed oven racks
3) removed screws holding old element
4) pulled out element far enough to remove 2 wires attached to old element
5) noted colors, left white, right black
6) attached new element to wires
7) attached new element to oven
8) put back oven racks
9) turn breaker back on
10) test oven
done

The bottom element had broken apart and needed to be replaced

  • Customer: Becky from Norman OK
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 17 of 19 people found this instruction helpful
The only reason I mentioned "a bit difficult" is that it is very important to unplug the unit first. I didn't want to say easy because I didn't want someone just jumping right in, (you do end up handling raw wires).
First I removed the two screws that were holding in the element to the back wall of the oven, then pulled out the old element slightly until you see where the wires are attached to the end of the element. I made note (I don't know if this is neccessary) which wire came off which screwset so I could put the new one in the same way. Took out the old element and attached the new one to the two screwsets on the ends of the element and then reinserted that part in in the back wall of the oven and attached plate that holds it in place. It was for my mother and she now thinks I'm a genius! Don't let anyone take a picture of you of you from behind because you definitely have to put your head in the oven. I believe the door is removable that may make it easier to get to it.

Mechanical/electrical clock/timer not working

  • Customer: Maxwell from RINGWOOD NJ
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 17 of 24 people found this instruction helpful
Followed the instruction provided except had to add a NEUTRAL LEAD which on the old part had been provided by the frame as it was metal/ electrical vs plastic/electronic . Used one of the extra Wire Extensions provided, drilled a hole in the clip connection and attached it to the metal frame holding in the replacement clock. The need for a NEUTRAL LEAD was not discussed in the instructions.

Element burned into.

  • Customer: Ward from Gilmer TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers
  • 14 of 15 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the two screws that held the element in place. I pulled the element out about 2-3 inches and then removed the two screws that fastened to the ends of the element. Was careful to keep the same wires separate in order to fasten the new element back to the same two wires. When fastening the new element ends back to the wires, care must be taken to not bend the ends of the element when tightening the small screws to the ends. Everything went real good and am most pleased with the very fast service portrayed by Parts Select. They are a class act company and rate very high in customer satisfaction!

Old mechanical timer worn out.

  • Customer: Theodore from Atwater CA
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers
  • 14 of 16 people found this instruction helpful
This digital timer, GE Part # WB19X10006 (PartSelect PS233996) is called out by GE as the current replacement for the mechanical timer in the JB500G*J1 range. I had tried to get one some time ago from another dealer but was told it was discontinued and no longer available, so I was pretty happy to come across it in the PartSelect catalog.

It comes with a number of mounting brackets and instructions to use the brackets that resemble the old parts, but when I did that the control buttons did not line up with the holes in the glass and were offset about 1/4" to the left. It was impossible to simply slide the timer over that far because it bumped into the underlying metal frame. I ended up using a longer set of brackets which lifted the timer about 1/2" off the glass, thereby avoiding interference with the frame, and bent the brackets sideways to line up with the holes in the glass. But then a transformer on the new timer stuck out about 1/4" too far in back to get the rear cover back on. I made two vertical cuts in the rear cover from the edge down past the timer and bent the resulting flap around the transformer. The resulting installation looks like it was made that way and works great.
All Instructions for the JKP27G*J4
1-15 of 590