Models > JGW8130DDB12 Maytag > Instructions

JGW8130DDB12 Jenn-Air Oven - Instructions

All installation instructions for JGW8130DDB12 parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the oven repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the JGW8130DDB12
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Oven wouldn’t heat up properly

  • Customer: James from Berwick ME
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 161 of 178 people found this instruction helpful
My oven has two igniters so I needed to determine which one was the problem.

Using the amp/multi meter I tested the connection between the igniters and the valve, with the oven turned on, to find the bad igniter. Depending on the model of stove you have, the amp reading you need for a properly functioning igniter will vary. My lower igniter read 2.7 amps with a rated amp between 3.3 and 3.6. So that was the culprit.

Replacing the igniter was easy. Two screws and a wire connected with a plug. I was able to do the diagnosis and unplug the wire without pulling the oven out. I pulled the drawer out and removed the two screws in a cover behind where the drawer was. You may not be so lucky…I have long arms.

I found removing the oven door made it easier to reach the igniter itself. To remove the door just open it slightly and pull up, it should come off easy…and replace in opposite manner.

Keep track of your screws and put it back together the way you found it except for the igniter that is.

Anyone with moderate technical skill could easily do this repair. The diagnosis is the hard part. I estimate I saved about $200 doing it myself.

Good luck.

F1 code - gas over would not heat.

  • Customer: george from birmingham AL
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 97 of 105 people found this instruction helpful
Repair tech checked oven and said the control panel was bad and needed to be replaced. The new control panel would cost over $450.00! I found that the oven sensor was bad and replaced it for $30.00. The old oven sensor had failed following a self cleaning cycle. I found that the wires coming out of it were burnt.

Replacing the oven sensor was very easy. I removed the back panels 6 screws to gain access to the sensor's connection. I then removed the 2 screw that hold the sensor in place inside the oven and pulled the old sensor out through the oven. I reversed this process to place the new sensor in the oven.

Our oven would not heat up, smelled like gas.

  • Customer: Theresa from Yorkville IL
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 46 of 51 people found this instruction helpful
I removed the oven door, unscrewed a couple of screws, replaced the ignitor, put screws back in, done! Sometimes it would take my oven up to an hour to heat up and sometimes it just wouldn't heat up, just fill the house with a gas smell. Now, it heats up in about 3 minutes!! We were considering buying a new oven, we will just keep this one. $40.00 beats $700.00

Oven would not turn on

  • Customer: William from Newkirk NM
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 36 of 41 people found this instruction helpful
First I pulled out the oven from the cabinet. Disconected the power, I removed the cover from the back, disconected the wires from the igniter. Removed the igniter from inside the oven. Reversed the process to install the igniter. Turned on the oven, it worked. Sat down and had a beer.

Stove wasn't reaching the set temperture.

  • Customer: Paul from Horizon City TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 33 of 36 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the two screws that hold the element in place. I then pulled the element out about 3 inches and disconnected the two wires. Replaced the element and attached the wires. Making sure I pushed the wires back through the hole far enough so the wires wouldn't touch the back of the stove. I then replaced the sensor by removing the two screws and pulling the wire through the hole so I could disconnect them. I reconnected the new sensor and made sure I pushed the wires back through the hole far enough away from the back of the stove. Replaced the screws and was all set to start the stove. I started the stove and it took about 10 min. to reach the set temperture. The stove worked great.

Oven Door Inner Glass Broken

  • Customer: Shariq from West Conshohocken PA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 29 of 30 people found this instruction helpful
This is fairly easy for anyone to do. First I opened up the front (silver part) of the oven door by removing the screws at the top and the bottom. Then I kept on removing the various layers of glass... the 2 outside ones are removed by removing their respective screws and then you get to the inner-most. These 2 inner ones are in a frame that holds them together. I removed the large silver frame that holds the insulation and the 2-glass-frame in it. Just remove the screws and then tilt the insulation frame out a bit to remove the glass frame. You can tilt the entire insulation holder out but the insulation is soft and it starts to fall off. Just tilting it enough worked for me. Then I opened up the glass frame from one end, removed the left-over broken piece of the old glass pane and installed the new one in. Then reassemble. The entire process is very easy - but you will need another person for a few minutes when you remove /reinstall the glass frame inside the insulation holder. You would just need a little help holding everything... nothing technical. I would rate the repair technicality at 4 or 5/10. It could even be a 3 if there were less steps involved. Good luck! By the way, Amana/Maytag wanted $70 or so for the glass and then the repair fee. I got the part here for about $50.

Needed to replace oven door gasket.

  • Customer: Lori from Scottsdale AZ
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers
  • 32 of 40 people found this instruction helpful
First removed the old gasket using a needle-nose pliers. Then placed new gasket by inserting the little clips on the gasket. Took 5 minutes. Great instructions from Repair Forum.

oven wouldnt maintain temperature

  • Customer: Patricia from Plainfield IL
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 24 of 28 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the oven grates and then the metal plate that covers the burner and igniter.Then I removed the two screws that hold in the igniter,be careful because the threads on the sheet metal screw strip off easily due to the heat. Then I slid out the storage drawer on the bottom of the stove.Next I removed two screws that hold on a cover in front of the gas valve where the igniter is plugged in.I unplugged the old igniter, removed it then replaced it with the new one.I then reassembled everything in the reverse order.I did have to use a nut and bolt to replace the damaged sheet metal screw.

Oven & Broiler Failed to Ignite

  • Customer: John from Baltimore MD
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 19 of 19 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the oven door for easier access then, removed the oven grates and bottom pan. Then there is a wing nut that holds the heat deflector in place over the manifold thats needs to be removed. Now you can see the igniter, remove the 2 small hex head screws and disconnect electrical connection.
Simply reverse the sequence to reinstall.
This may sound like alot to do but it only took 15 minutes to complete and I'm not an appliance repair person. Anyone who is somewhat of a handyman can accomplish this job.

Oven would not heat- Beeped nonstop and flashed F3

  • Customer: Erin from Greenwich CT
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 18 of 20 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed two screws that hold the oven sensor in place. I then removed the screws that held the panel on the back of the oven. I simply unclipped the plastic adaptor and replaced the old sensor with the new one. I screwed the sensor back in and put the back panel on. turned the power back on to the oven and hit the bake button. Voila!! The oven turned on and now it works like new!!!

Door handle and trim broke

  • Customer: RICHARD from Stafford VA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 19 of 23 people found this instruction helpful
1st removed the door from the hinges by sliding it up. Then removed all the screws holding the door together. Then removed the screw securing the trim. Removed the screws from inside the trim holding the old handle... replaced the handle and trim. replaced all screws in reverse order. Replaced the door on the hinges. all done

Oven rack lost in a garage fire

  • Customer: Bob from Saint Clair Shores MI
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 17 of 21 people found this instruction helpful
First I opened the door to the oven. Then I opened the box that the part came in. (knife) I then slid the oven rack out of the box and unwrapped the plastic, being careful not to bend or scratch the new rack. Now, this is the tricky part... I had to move the existing rack down one space to make room for the new one. Then carefully slid the new rack in, tipping it slightly and sliding it in. LOL

Oven wouldnt ignite

  • Customer: Rodney from Menomonee Falls WI
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 14 of 15 people found this instruction helpful
Turned gas and electricity off first. Pulled out the bottom pan so I could access the igniter. Removed two screws holding the igniter next to the burner tube, unplugged the igniter from the back of the stove and then pulled the plug threw into the oven. Mounted new igniter and then pulled the plug threw and plugged it back in. Reinstalled bottom pan and I was done in 15 - 20 minutes. VERY EASY TO DO...

oven door inner glass pane broke

  • Customer: Kimberly from Ascutney VT
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 13 of 13 people found this instruction helpful
removed oven door, removed screws from bottom and sided, door is in layers, removed door layers like taking apart a sanwhich layer by layer, once i got to the inner layer i just had to bend out the little tab on the frame,remove the broken pane and place in the new one, bend the tab back and then put the door back together layer by layer, it was very easy and saved me money, and frustration in dealing with a repair man from a well known company who tried to tell me I needed to replace the whole door as the glass was factory sealed in the door, WELL! this girl's hair may be blonde but not that blonde, I received the glass the very next day, and it took me 40 minutes tops to replace the glass, EASY! KC

Kept getting F3 errors

  • Customer: Daniel from Long Beach CA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 13 of 15 people found this instruction helpful
My oven stopped working and the display read F3 error. I looked up the code and found that it was probably the thermostat sensor. I ordered the part from partselect.com and when it arrived I went to install it but I ran into a somewhat scary issue. I found that I had to pull my oven out of the wall in order to replace the sensor.

After a minor nervous breakdown, I decided to go for it and found that it was much easier than I had imagined. Changing the sensor involves taking out the two screws that hold the sensor in place (inside of the oven), pulling it out to the point you can reach the connector, plugging in the new sensor and screwing it back in place. However, if you have an oven like my model, you have to pull out the whole oven from the wall in order to reach the plug on the sensor. This sounds like a lot of trouble but for me it was very easy. The oven is held in place with screws around the front side. Most are easily accessed and you don't have to take out any critical/complicated pieces of the oven. My screw gun made short issue of the problem and I found that the oven was out of the wall within minutes. I could then easily unscrew a small back cover, change the sensor and then screw the oven back into the wall. Being very careful, the whole operation took about 20 minutes. I recommend that you get help from a friend just because the oven is bulky. It is not heavy, an average sized male can handle the weight but it’s easier with a friend. Also, be careful that the gas hose which feeds the oven is long enough (and not tangled) for you to move the oven out of its space. Obviously, be careful about gas leaks.
All Instructions for the JGW8130DDB12
1-15 of 218