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JCD2389GES Jenn-Air Refrigerator - Instructions

All installation instructions for JCD2389GES parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the refrigerator repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the JCD2389GES
46-60 of 810
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Motor for turning coil that ejects the ice detached from the ice enclosure due to cracked plastic on the enclosure.

  • Customer: John from Virginia Beach VA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 10 of 11 people found this instruction helpful
1. Removed ice bin.
2. Removed vertical panel next to ice bin by sliding two top supports off of support posts and pulling the panel out and up.
3. Removed screw on left side holding ice enclosure in place.
4. Pull ice enclosure out about six inches and tip back end down exposing electrical connector.
5. Detach the electrical connector by pressing the release tabs on the top and bottom of the connector.
6. Removed ice eclosure by pulling it up and out.
7. Detached motor (4 screws) and relay (4 screws) from plastic enclosure. Make sure to keep track of screw positions since they are not all the same size. Use same positions to reassemble.
8. Hold shaft of motor with needle nose vise grips and remove the "U" shaped end piece by turning it clockwise. A sharp rap with a screwdriver handle breaks it loose. Pay attention to the orientation of the washer under the "U" shaped piece (the raised inner edge next to the shaft goes against the "U" shaped piece.
9. Attach the motor and relay to the new ice enclosure paying attention to the screw position.
10. Put the washer on the motor shaft (raised side up) and screw on "U" shaped piece (counter-clockwise).
11. The rest of the installation is a reversal of the removal process.

overload relay switch/bad compressor--buzzing sound, ends with click, retries

  • Customer: Nathan from Garland TX
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 11 of 14 people found this instruction helpful
Remove back cover. Disconnect power. Pull out overload switch off compressor. Remove capacitor. The overload switch i ordered came with instructions. What took the most time was figuring out if i dared installing it the way i thought best. The instructions, in my instance, were incorrect. My overload switch didn't have a terminal #1. Long story short, i looked at the circuit diagram it came with, and based on process of elimination based on terminal sizes, I put it together. But the instructions weren't accurate. All in all for the average DIY, not a bad repair at all. I am still afraid that my problem is the compressor, b/c even after the new part is installed it still occasionally tries starting but can't, and keeps retrying until it does. It is either a faulty relay switch or a faulty compressor. We'll see which one wins.

No water in door or icemaker

  • Customer: Eric from Menan ID
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 11 of 17 people found this instruction helpful
From the beginning I have never had good water flow in the door and ice cubes turned out funky. I tried replacing the filter once with hardly noticeable change. The change I did see was $35 less in my pocket. So I bought a filter bypass plug and it now works like a champ. I have well water so I trust its quality and I am very satisfied. I would describe how I did the repair but if you don't no how to change out the filter you probably shouldn't be trying it.

Freezer and fresh food sections too warm, with control settings at coolest.

  • Customer: DAVID from PEABODY MA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 10 of 14 people found this instruction helpful
Thanks to previously posted PartSelect stories, I had a good idea on how to proceed. This component, as others have suggested, is clearly a piece of junk. This is the third time it has been replaced, once under warranty, again in a service call for $160 and now by me, with a PartSelect unit for $52.
The circuit board, with integral relay, resides in the extreme upper right hand corner of the fresh food compartment.
Remove upper shelf.
Remove white plastic control cover through which the lights illuminate the compartment. Finger grips at both sides at rear. Slide forward about an inch to clear the tabs visible at the rear, then tilt down and off. The owners' manual describes this at "Changing the Light Bulbs". It also gets the lightbulb description wrong, but ..........
Now remove the hex head screw facing you at the rear center. Then get its two cousins which are vertically positioned to hold the front of this housing up into the roof. They're left and right, just rearwards of the ends of the control setting dial.
These three tapping screws which you now have in hand are about 1 1/4" long.
Next, there are two Phillips head screws, also into the roof, whice are just to the rear of the two light sockets. Removing these, and the left one is awkward, frees up the control totally except for the wiring harness, which restrains it at the rear.
No matter, just tilt the unit down so that the front lip is pointed down towards you.
The piece-o-crap board is at the right rear.
Pop off the connector, takes some force, and put in your new module.
Order another one now, you will need it.
The service tech who changed out my next-to-last one left a circuit diagram back there with the new control, like saying "I'll be back."

Bottom of freezer compartment was icing up/freezer was leaking water

  • Customer: Jason from Clarkston MI
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 8 of 8 people found this instruction helpful
UNPLUG YOUR FRIDGE BEFORE YOU START> First I removed the shroud covering the lights and controls in the top of the refrigerator side. This was the hardest part, actually. Their are two indentations on the back of the cover and it is really hard to pull that cover off. Anyhow, once you do that, their are two screws, one by each light bulb in the top of the fridge that need to be removed. Their are also three hex head screws that need to be removed, two in the front corners of the assembly, one in the center, back of the fridge. Take those out and the whole assembly drops down. In the back right had corner of the assembly is the adaptive defrost control. Unplug it and set it aside. Plug the new one in. Put everything back together and you are back in business.

Ice maker stopped working

  • Customer: Ronald from Chardon OH
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 8 of 8 people found this instruction helpful
Since I had no water in the try I started with the valve first. That did not fix the problem so I replaced the Ice Maker assembly however that still didn't solve my problem. The only thing left was the relay that entergized the valve. The part number shows NLA so I googled the part number on the relay and found one at Mouser Electronics under PN:G2R-1A-T-AC120. The whole project took me several days to solve however the actual time involved was only about 1 hour.

Ice stripper broken on ice maker

  • Customer: Kenneth from New Braunfels TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 10 of 14 people found this instruction helpful
I unplugged the fridge. Loosened the 2 top screws on the ice maker and removed the lower screw. I disconnected the wiring harness and removed the Ice maker. I removed the plastic timer cover in front. I then loosened the screws on the face of the ice maker and removed the broken ice stripper and replaced it with a new one. Re-tightened the screws on the face, installed the timer cover, plugged in the wiring harness, re-attached the ice maker. Plugged the fridge back in and walla, it was making ice in 30 minutes!

Hollow Ice Cubes, Stuck Icemaker & no more cubes

  • Customer: Jonathan from Scottsdale AZ
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 10 of 14 people found this instruction helpful
We have a Reverse Osmosis water filter supplying the fridge, so the internal water filter only served to reduce the water pressure inside the unit. I installed the bypass plug by simply twisting and removing the internal water filter and then twisting the plug up into the same hole. Done in 5 min.
Longest part of this was clearing the top shelf to reach back there... Oh, and figuring out that this part exists and that it could help with the problems we were having with the unit. The water filter is relatively new, less than six months, but it still contributed to the problem enough to cause the failure.
[Thank you Partselect.com for having this web database set up that gets EXACTLY the right part!].

Now about the hollow cubes: Do a web search and you'll find a lot of discussion about it. This is specific to the Whirlpool (Maytag, and others) newer style front to back icemakers that create "half moon" shaped icecubes. For a Shop Manual to a web search for 4316835.pdf for this series.
No doubt my old unit's icemaker solenoid valve on the back isn't passing as much pressure as it did new, but by itself it isn't fatal just yet. You can tell if you are vulnerable to this if the water spigot on the front only delivers a very slow trickle of water; if it takes a l o n g t i m e to fill a glass.

But here is the rest of the story: There is a fundamental design flaw in the way the icemaker unit was created that makes it malfuntion if the water pressure is too low - they chose to put the thermocouple (TC) that senses the temperature of the freezing cube on the opposite end (front) of the water tray from the water fill tube which fills from the rear. This was probably a manufacturing trade off for simplicity of assembly and it saved them half a cent's worth of copper wiring and a couple of screws. And maybe a safty concern about wiring under an open water channel, but that is a lousy excuse; there are other solutions, and the power "harness" goes right by there within a couple of inches anyway...

There are a number of reasons for low pressure:
- Bad supply inlet valve, or not open all the way, crimped tubing
- Bad Frige icemaker solenoid valve
- Clogged internal water filter (even just a little)
- Frozen ice plug in the fill tube, in the very back top of the unit against the back (use a hair dryer to defrost)
- Etc. Do some more web research for more details.
Of course the icemaker timers do fail as well, so this discussion assumes the icemaker is still functioning as "normally" as it can, given its design limitations.

The interaction with water pressure (design flaw!) is this: if the unit doesn't get enough water due to low pressure, then the final cube position to fill doesn't get any water in it (the front one by the motor). This is the one that the TC is next to as well, so it cools of really quickly and the TC thinks the tray is completely frozen, when in fact it isn't. The TC fires the cycling motor which turns on the heater and then spins the ejector shaft which has tabs that push the half moon shaped cubes around and out. However, since the cubes weren't fully frozen, only their outer shell gets pushed out - the water in the middle drains out leaving a hollow cube set. That liquid water hits the cold ejector bars and some of it immediately freezes, making little stalactite fingers that catch on the tabs and side of the tray, thus jamming the ejector shaft and pausing the cycle in place indefinitely.
The net is that you get a few hollow cubes and then no more ice until you reach in and crack off the ice fingers so shaft tabs can pass and the motor can finsh the cycle and properly stop in its home position. You can also tell by checking whether the front cube location has water in it just after it fills by reaching around and dipping your finger in it. If it comes up dry, then you have this problem.
So, in my case, putting the bypass plug in increased my flow t

Fridge stopped working

  • Customer: Dan from Sumner WA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 8 of 9 people found this instruction helpful
I called a repair man from a pretty large name to come out and take a look. He found out in about 10 minutes that it was a bad capacitor. The quote he gave me was $75 for the part and $175 labor. I tried my best not to laugh and tell him no thank you. He did have to charge me for him to show up, which was only $98.
So I used what he told(minus the "scrap it") and opened it back up. Although he had left wires everywhere and the broken pieces laying inside, I thought it was enough for me to order the part. PartSelect was very easy to navigate and ordering was a breeze. Took about 4 days to get the part and I ordered in the X-mas craze. Fixed it in about 15 minutes.

the water dispenser would not shut off quickly

  • Customer: Ludwig from Pleasantville NY
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 8 of 9 people found this instruction helpful
Pull out fridge and unplug
Remove drip tray from dispenseer
Unscrew face plate (star bit) 2 screws
Carefully disconnect wire strap from faceplate controls
Unscrew dispenser from chute - 3 screws and one is hddend next to actuator.
Carefully disconnect another wire strap to remove unit.
Remove actuator pad
Remove limit switch (i small philips screw)
Replace switch & pad
Re-assemble

Neither the actuator pad nor the limit switch appeared broken or worn but it appears to have solved the problem.

Not a terribly complicaed repair but you need to take care not to damage anything as you take apart. More work than just changing a filter or bulb.

Water valve had cracked in a move and was leaking badly

  • Customer: Kelly from Rifle CO
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 8 of 10 people found this instruction helpful
Replaced the water valve with the new part by removing 2 screws to allow folding back of the cover, removing 1 screw and pulling valve assembly out. 1 more screw took the two valves apart, unscrewed the water lines, replaced them on new valve (with newer push-in connections it was even easier), reassembled unit, turned the water on, checked for leaks, none found. Works great, was very easy.

Auger motor broke off of ice maker enclosuer

  • Customer: Carl from Gurnee IL
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 8 of 10 people found this instruction helpful
Very easy to remove one screw holding the enclosuer, then unplug the wire harness, remove 4 screws holding the solinoid, and the 4 screws holding the auger motor. The hardest part was removing the auger from the shaft of the motor. this took most of the time. reassembly went very fast.

Refrigerator not cold - ice build up in freezer cabinet

  • Customer: James from Toluca Lake CA
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 9 of 13 people found this instruction helpful
Chronically faulty electronic board in upper right rear of refrigerator compartment - in Maytag and Jenn-Air. Unplug unit. Remove freezer food to ice chest. Remove baskets and shelves, ice hopper and rear lower panel to expose evaporater fins. Defrost with hair dryer and allow all moisture to dry. Then in refrigerator, remove top shelf food. Carefully remove the upper assembly cover by working the plastic down and slide forward to unhook from rear slide attachments - one on each side. This is the hard part of repair.

Then remove screws from rear wall and just behind the lamps to release the whole control assembly. In the rear right corner is the bad board. Unplug and replace with new board. Reassemble the fridge and freezer. Replug unit.

Freezer was overfrosting and not defrosting. Frig. was not getting cold.

  • Customer: Daniel O. from Gilroy CA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 7 of 7 people found this instruction helpful
This was very easy. I removed all the shelves in the freezer compartment. I removed two nutscrews to remove the back wall. Then I removed the little radiator looking part by removing two more nutscrews. I unplugged the old thermostat assembly and installed the new one exactly like I removed it, then I reversed the procedure to put it all back together. Very easy my wife could have done it. ThANKS!! to Parts Select for the help of all the blogs I read before doing the job.

Freezer Door Seal Leak

  • Customer: Nancy from Dallas TX
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: More than 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 7 of 7 people found this instruction helpful
Installing the seal was fairly easy. the seal as arrived from vendor was very deformed. It came with no instructions. I was able to use a hair dryer to heat the seal and soften the rubber. While softened I pressed the seal into the frame. It slowly began to hold and take shape. Some areas where the seal had been folded in the carton took foam filler to hold into position.
All Instructions for the JCD2389GES
46-60 of 810