Models > GEW9200LW1 > Instructions

GEW9200LW1 Whirlpool Dryer - Instructions

All installation instructions for GEW9200LW1 parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the dryer repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the GEW9200LW1
31-45 of 593
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Poorly designed lint filter/ gasket falls off

  • Customer: John from Madison WI
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 16 of 22 people found this instruction helpful
Replaced

Dryer would not start - bad door switch

  • Customer: Paul from Robbinsville NJ
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 19 of 32 people found this instruction helpful
Removed to top panel - two screws in the back
Removed the screws from the metal panel holding the electronic board, remove the wire clips and rotated the metal panel up and out of the way.
Disconnected the three wire connector to the door switch cable - There must be a special tool for this as a basically destroyed the connector on the door switch cable.
Use a pliers to pull out the door switch from the front. This was not easy and I wound up having to destroy the door switch to get it out.
Inserted the new door switch cable first from the fron of the dryer and connected the new door switch cable connector to the dryer wiring harness.
Rotated the main electronic panel back in place, re-inserted the cable harness and re-inserted the bracket screws.
Re-installed the top panel and screws.

noisy drum

  • Customer: Jeff from Mesa AZ
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers, Wrench set, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 13 of 16 people found this instruction helpful
the job would have gone faster if the right parts had been sent in the first place. I would have never paid for two day shipping. In the repair, I removed the rear panel, clipped the plastic triangle holding the bearing, installed the new bearing and new clip.

Motor out

  • Customer: Jeff from Hutchinson KS
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 42 of 104 people found this instruction helpful
I found that the dryer would not start turning by itself. Could manually help it start and it would run fine. Anyway, after a new set of rollers, belt, etc. found that the motor still would not start by itself. Ordered new motor and it was taken care of. You have to take the back off, remove the belt and remove the tumbler. After that, it is fairly easy. Two screws hold the motor down and then you can take the whole motor assembly out. Be careful removing the fan as it takes a 3/8 socket drive and it is plastic. Two clips hold the motor to the assembly. Needle nose pliers takes care of it. Replace and all should be good.

Dryer runs with no heat

  • Customer: Paul from Bradford MA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers
  • 12 of 15 people found this instruction helpful
It was easier to remove the blower manifold cover, (3 screws) to get at the heater element. Remove the heat shield, disconnect the two wires from the element. There is another screw on the side holding the element in the housing. Remove it and slide the element torward you. I used pliers as it was a snug fit. Replace. Good time to vacuum the whole area.

dryer wouldnt heat

  • Customer: JEFF from LEBANON TN
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Socket set
  • 14 of 23 people found this instruction helpful
First i tested each part for continuity and found out that the thermal fuse was bad. So ordered the part and went ahead and got thermostat and element to ensure no problems in the future since I already was in there.

The felt strip on the filter had come undone.

  • Customer: Rebecca from Laredo TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 13 of 20 people found this instruction helpful
Took the old filter out and inserted the new one- works great!!

seal for lint filter came off

  • Customer: John from Midland TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 11 of 15 people found this instruction helpful
Pulled out the old and slid in the new filter

Dryer turns off after 1-2 minutes

  • Customer: Dixon from Santa Fe NM
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 9 of 10 people found this instruction helpful
I tried to follow directions followed by others on this site after diagnosing the problem via suggestions provided by users. I have a Whirlpool Duet dryer from 2002. We've had problems since moving about 3 years ago. I removed the front panel (lower) by unscrewing the two bottom screws (1/4" sheet metal screws). Then I took out the lint screen and the metal tube/contraption immediately beneath to get access to the area where thermistor is located. See the drawing/chart to help you locate this. It's really easier than it seems. Make sure you have the chart/drawing for your model - it makes difference! The thermistor came out pretty easily with a nutdriver that has a swivel offset shaft. Ask your hardware store tool dept. about that one. Put everything back in reverse order of course and test either with/without the front panel re-attached. In my case it fixed at least part of the problem. I was able to get clothes almost dry with most settings but I have yet to install the moisture sensor to see if that helps in addition to the internal-bias thermistor. I am the kind of person that does one thing at a time so at least I now know the thermistor was bad. Good luck and hang in there with your own repair. It's a lot cheaper even if it takes you longer to do than a pro.

Idler Pulley broke

  • Customer: Keith from Richmond VA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Socket set
  • 9 of 10 people found this instruction helpful
I disconnect the power, then the vent pipe. I removed the back panel of the dryer to access the pulley and removed the belt. Replaced the back and put everything back together.

Flashing E1 code for a bad thermistor

  • Customer: John from Cedar Rapids IA
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 12 of 19 people found this instruction helpful
I replaced the thermistor earlier, but the code was still flashing. I noticed the heater terminals were charred and pretty well covered in carbon. So, I replaced the heater, the thermostat and thermal fuse and replaced the 3/8" spade terminals on the heater wires. (These are hard to find - most electrical spades terminals are .250. Also, I crimped and soldered these for a connection with the lowest resistance possible). After all that, the code still flashed! I let the explatives fly, calmed down, and ran the control board test. (This is done by pressing "more time" "less time" "more time" "less time" in succession.) The control board was passing all the tests, but the thermistor test, and the only thing is in this circuit is the thermistor, the wires, the connector to the control board, and some circuit on the control board that involves a few resistors and the "brain" chip. So, I checked the terminals at the thermistor, the wires up to the control board and the connector at the board. The control board connector was fairly dust encrusted, so I unplugged it, cleaned the control board terminals and sucked away all the lint and dust. Finally, I carefully removed earch crimp terminal from the Molex connector (the white female connector) and cleaned and bent them to yield a better connection to the terminals on the control board. I put it all back together, and thus far it is working fine.

Door catch on dryer door broke

  • Customer: Lynne from Jamestown CA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 8 of 8 people found this instruction helpful
PartSelect sent me three different door catches with instructions for choosing the correct one. I did choose and simply inserted it into the slot and voile! All finished and it works great now! PartSelect had the part delivered the day after my order was placed. I would suggest doing business with them to anyone asking who they might contact for a part. I especially appreciated the ease of identifying and ordering from them. I was able to do all of this on-line via their website.

Broken timer knob

  • Customer: John from Yorba Linda CA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 10 of 15 people found this instruction helpful
Was very simple repair, and just required pushing the new knob on by hand pressure. The part was ordered and it was delivered in two days, and I will not hesitate to order from this company again

Dryer gasket detached from screen

  • Customer: Richard from Duarte CA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 8 of 10 people found this instruction helpful
Received in two days, open box, installed part. Pretty easy, fast service. I'm a repeat customer and will use these guys in the future.

Dryer tumbled but would not heat

  • Customer: LARRY from NEWNAN GA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Socket set
  • 7 of 7 people found this instruction helpful
Used socket set to remove the two hex-head screws from the bottom flange of the toe panel. Manually pulled the panel out at the bottom, pulled down, and removed the panel. Looked to right and found heater shield. Removed heather shield using socket set. Removed the two wires from the terminal block (had to use a little WD40 to loosen connection and wiped up afterwards). Removed the holding screw holding the heating element using the socket set. Pulled HARD on old heating element using pliers and a rag (protection from accidental cut-sharp edges). Once out, the new element slid in relatively easy. Screwed the new element back into place and re-connected the element wires, then put the heater shield back into place. Put the toe panel back into place. Tested and worked great! The only thing that made this "easy" but not "really easy" is that I had to really pull HARD on the old element to get it out...with the sharp edges and tight fit in play, you'll need to pay attention to safety when removing the old element.
All Instructions for the GEW9200LW1
31-45 of 593