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DBSR463EG1WW General Electric Dryer - Instructions

All installation instructions for DBSR463EG1WW parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the dryer repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the DBSR463EG1WW
16-30 of 807
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The dryer door handle broke off.

  • Customer: Jim from North Richland Hills TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 43 of 46 people found this instruction helpful
I pried out the remaining pieces of the handle out of the door with a screwdriver. When the new part arrived, I snapped it into place and it was done. It fit perfectly.

Dryer would get very hot and then turn off

  • Customer: David from Auburn MA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 158 of 395 people found this instruction helpful
It was actually my father, he doesn't use the internet. He thought that because the dyer got real hot and then shut off he thought the thermostat wasn't working and the high temp shutoff was okay. He went through the manual and found the part and took it out. He called the service number but they wanted $50 dollars plus shipping. I saw it was a Thermo-disc part so I tried the manufacture's website but I couldn't match the numbers on the back to their part numbers. I tried several other sites and your site was the cheapest. It was real easy to use the web site and diagrams to find the right schematic and part. I ordered it online and it was delivered in 2 days with the regular shipping. When he first put it in the dyer didn't turn on. He found no power coming out of the timer so he cleaned the contacts and it worked. Thanks for making the ordering so easy.

squeaky dryer for a week or two

  • Customer: warren from Flint MI
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 35 of 41 people found this instruction helpful
First I unplugged the dryer and turned off the gas

Second I opened the door and unscrewed the two screws that go up into the top panel and hold it in place (you will need to get down and look under the top of the door jam to see the screws).

Third I lifted the front of the top enough to remove the two screws holding the front panel on (Use a magnetic screwdriver if you have one you do not want to lose the screws taking them out or putting them back in)

Fourth positioned a chair to lean front panel against so it would not fall over or strain the electrical wires that run to the switch in the door (slide the front panel off slowly supporting the drum with your hand so it doe not drop hard on the motor wires or burners)

Sixth determined the parts I needed and ordered parts from pars select and got them in two days

Seventh when new parts arrived I unclipped the old DRUM BEARING removed the felt gasket, put the felt in the new Drum bearing and clipped it in place

Eighth clipped in the 2 new Dryer Drum Slides and 2new SLIDE WH slides

Ninth Vacuumed out dryer and vent pipe completely

Tenth reassembled dryer being careful to make sure drum was properly aligned as I put the front panel in place and the belt was in the proper place on drum and all the screws were back in place.

Ninth turned gas back on and plugged in dryer

Ten turned on dryer to test squeak was gone

Hints as soon as you hear a squeak look into it and you will probably not have to replace the DRUM BEARING. But if any of the Slides are bad replace them all. Check your belt and felt gaskets to see if they are in good shape. If everything up front is in good shape and it is not the motor squeaking it could be the back drum bearing. Take your time keep your old dryer running for a few more years and save the $40 dollar service call. Do not forget to clean out all the old lint and dust out of your dryer and vent pipes not only will you reduce the risk of fire you will be allowing air to pass through the dryer more easily drying your clothes in shorter time.

The timer switch was so hard to turn it broke the knob.

  • Customer: wendell from hephzibah GA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 33 of 36 people found this instruction helpful
I pulled the dryer three feet from the wall. UN-PLUGGED THE UNIT!! Removed 3 screws from the very top of the dryer,and pulled 1 wire at a time from the old switch and put it on the new one. Super easy.

belt broken, pulley worn out

  • Customer: Anthony from Mpls MN
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Socket set
  • 35 of 43 people found this instruction helpful
Removed 4 screws from top of control panel , remove 2 from back to lossen top of dryer. Removed rear lower access cover,6 screws on back of dryer exposing pulley and tensioner, remove broken belt and vaccuumed out a ton of lint , removed pulley and tensioner and replaced. From the front remove 4 screws and take off front of dryer, disconnecting several wires, again vaccumed out lint, lifter drum evough to replace belt. Reassembled


  • Customer: Tracy from Winston Salem NC
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 29 of 30 people found this instruction helpful
I ordered parts based off other peoples findings. I took the top and front off the Dryer. I found the drum bearing(really only a plastic bracket. The slide were completely worn and the drum was wearing into the plastic drum bearing. I popped the old drum bearing out and put the new on in. There are actually 2 sets of slides (4 total). I only bought 2. I reused two of the existing slides. I put the unit back together and it was a lot quieter. I need to order more of the slides. They are only a couple dollars a piece and take most of the beating. I should've but didn't get the pasking or gasket. it was broken. I think it'll be fine though.

My clothes were being "bitten", discolored with blackish smudges, and buttons eaten off clothing

  • Customer: Deborah from Glenburn ME
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 25 of 28 people found this instruction helpful
First I really had to hunt for the proper way to get my dryer drum accessible for the repair. With my model it was as simple as removing two screws to take off the top panel (located by opening the dryer door), and then removing two other screws inside the front panel at the top. The front will then be able to swing to the left side (the door switch wires are on this side for this model). Simply remove the drum bearing by gently pulling it off. My slides were in such poor shape for less than 4 years old!! One of them had completely disintegrated! These slides have a small whole on one end which attaches to a small nub at the edge of a slot while the other side just slid into a slot at the other end. No need to even take out the drum!!
The hardest part of the job was to get into the dryer!

Rubbing/Squealing Noise While Drying, especially during cold weather

  • Customer: Gary from Spring Hill TN
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 22 of 22 people found this instruction helpful
This part arrived at our house two days after I ordered it. I was stunned by how quickly it arrived.

Our dryer was making a very annoying squeaking/rubbing noise while drying and it became worse as the outside temps dropped (it's winter)...colder air cooling the exhaust line, causing metal in dryer to contract more.

I called an appliance repair service and they said, "Honestly, your money is going to be better spent to just buy a new dryer. The bearings on these are a pain to replace."

Yeah, right.

I've never taken apart a dryer, but it took me less than 45 minutes to complete this repair and our dryer is back to normal. Total cost was $18, including shipping. A $300 savings versus buying a new dryer.

There is another description of the process for this part so I won't repeat it all.

I did it a little differently than most, namely I did not remove the dryer drum. I simply pulled it out about six inches (make sure and slide belt back as you inch out the drum). But first, unplug the dryer, then remove the top, then the front.

A Philips screwdriver will quickly remove the top of the dryer (two screws on inside front, where door closes) and the front face (two screws at top of front, inside face). Lift the front up about an inch and it is free. I had to disconnect a couple wires, just make sure you mark before you disconnect them.

With that done, the drum will pull straight toward you (out). Make sure and support the weight of the drum as you slide it out. I found no need to remove the drum.

At the rear inside of our drum, there are three Torx screws that hold the bearing assembly on. I have a pretty long reach so I just removed two of the Torx screws, then reached around the back of the drum while removing the third screw, to keep the bearing assembly from falling onto the floor behind the back of the drum.

This plastic bearing is held to the bearing shaft by a little o-ring. Just pull the o-ring off, slide off the old bearing, slide the new bearing on and replace the o-ring (if yours is broken, any home store will have one that will work as a replacement in their faucet repair department).

Reattach the bearing housing to the drum with the Torx screws (get all three started before you tighten any of them), slide the drum back in - make sure you slide the belt as you move the drum back in and support the weight of the drum so you don't bash the bearing assembly into the back of the dryer.

You're doing this part blind, but in a few seconds, you can guide the bearing back into the hole in the back wall of the dryer. It just slides into the hole, nothing fancy.

Put the front of the dryer back on. Then replace the top (I had to remove the five screws on top of the dial panel to give it some flex so the top would pop back into place without stressing the dial panel), plug the dryer back in, and fire it up.

45 minutes after this part arrived at our home, our dryer problems were gone. Now that I've done one, I could probably do it in 20 minutes the next time (it's that simple/easy). And we didn't need a new dryer. Makes me think I should have the appliance guy who told me we needed a new dryer to direct all of these "pain in the fanny" bearing replacements to me because I could charge someone $50 total for the repair and make good money.

Hope all this babble helps someone else who doesn't need a new dryer.

worn out drum bearing(squeaky)

  • Customer: Warren from Ballston Lake NY
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 22 of 23 people found this instruction helpful
If you're dis-assembling the dryer panels to remove the drum to acess the bearing located at the rear of the drum,don't hesitate to buy a idler pulley kit and a belt.It's easier to change them now,while it's apart. besides,their all pretty much in the same state of wear! In lew of prying my son away from the computer,an extra set of hands is a help, I used a scrap piece of 4x4 with a 1 inch whole bored in one side to place the bearing end into to steady it to get the screws started. otherwise you need to have 6ft.arms! re-assembly wasn't bad, a magnetic tipped #3 screw driver eliminates the frustration of dropping panel screws down inside the partially assembled body.

Dryer wouldn't run at all

  • Customer: Julie from Delmar MD
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 22 of 25 people found this instruction helpful
First I figured out it was the start switch, I heard it make an electrical zap noise when I turned it and then the dryer didn't start. Once I had the part I simply removed the back from the dryer with a screwdriver (5 phillips head screws and 1 flat head). Then I twisted the old switch and it popped right out. Then I unhooked the wires and rehooked them to the new switch. Then I twisted the new switch into place, tested the dryer - IT WORKED! After that I just replaced the back cover and I was done. It was so quick! I am a 25 year old single mother with a 21 month and 4 month old. If I can do it on my own anyone can!

Broken Dryer Belt

  • Customer: Richard from Ashton MD
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 22 of 26 people found this instruction helpful
I had to take most of the dryer apart because there is no rear access to the motor. It turned out to be easy to dissasembel the dryer. The only problem that I had was that I could not figure out how to route the belt around the motor and the idol pullies. I could not find anywhere that gave instructions on how to properly tension the belt. I finally figured out that the idoler pulley needs to be locked in place on the right side of the engie mount. Then the belt needs to be routed over idoler pulley and under the motor pulley. Finally release the idoler pully from the locked postion to put tension on the belt. It really turned out to be pretty easy.

Faulty Timer

  • Customer: Donald from Atlanta GA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 23 of 29 people found this instruction helpful
Pulled dryer out from wall, disconnected dryer power cord, removed 3 screws on back that fasten control panel, tilted panel forward, rotated faulty timer to remove it. Removed wires one at a time and connected each to new timer on same connection as on old timer.

Dryer would squeal when first starting and then gradually became very noisey.

  • Customer: Gene from Kutztown PA
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: More than 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 19 of 21 people found this instruction helpful
The repair was done as follows:

1. Removed the door
2. Removed the two screws securing the top panel then removed the panel.
3. Removed the two screws securing the front panel then removed the panel.
4. Removed the screws securing the left side panel then removed side panel and the two leveling feet.
5. Tipped dryer over on its back (you will want to protect your floor, the four screws that attach the heater unit protrude through the back).
6. Disengaged the belt tensioner and removed the belt and the drum.
7. Removed the three Torx screws securing the drum bearing to the drum and discarded old bearing.
8. Removed the four screws securing the bearing retainer to the heater unit.
9. Removed the four screws securing the heater unit and two sensor wires.
10. Lifted heater unit just high enough to remove bearing retainer. Discarded bearing retainer.

The new drum bearing kit is supplied with self tapping screws. I installed the screws into the bearing parts to tap the holes and then removed them prior to assembly.

11. Installed new bearing retainer to back of heater unit using the supplied screws. Install the four screws by hand, finger tight.
12. Re-attached heater unit and tighten screws.
13. Re-attached sensor wires.
14. Tightened the four bearing retainer screws.
15. Attached new drum bearing to drum using the three supplied Torx screws. I used tape to hold everything together while installing the screws.
Tightened the Torxscrews.

Next I used a vacuum to remove all the lint from inside the dryer. I also used a small plastic putty knife to remove the caked on lint on the impeller blades.

16. Inserted drum bearing into bearing retainer.
17. Installed drum belt and belt tensioner.
18. Installed left side panel and feet.
19. Replaced the two grey and two white slide bearings on the front panel. They just slip onto a small post and slide into a slot.
20. Installed front panel. (Rotate drum to help with installation)
21. Installed top panel and door


Squeaking Dryer - Rear Drum bearing gone bad

  • Customer: Jason from Cary NC
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: More than 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers, Socket set
  • 19 of 22 people found this instruction helpful
First, I loosened the the top control panel and then loosened the top flat roof panel which allowed me access to the inside of the dryer. Then, I removed the front panel which allowed access to the drum. I was amazed at the amount of lint that was inside the dryer itself. Most of my time was spent in the disassembly and cleaning of the internal cavity around the drum. I reached below the drum and removed the belt from the pulley wheels and then unscrewed the drum (from the inside) from the back of the dryer and bearing kit. I removed the diffuser and cleaned it thoroughly. Then I replaced the entire drum bearing kit - the old one was almost completely dissentigrated. I probably should have applied some kind of non-flammable lubricant to the new bearing kit - the instructions did not include this step but after about 3 loads a slight squeak (different). I put everything back together - applying the new drum kit will require 2 sets of hands (my 9-year old daughter did great at this). I re-assembled the dryer and it works great, again except for the slight squeak that's still there. I may disassemble it again and apply some lubricant but I do not know what kind to get; I need to check that out.

dryer would not heat

  • Customer: Mike from Simpsonville SC
  • Difficulty: Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 26 of 43 people found this instruction helpful
The heating element was broken.
All Instructions for the DBSR463EG1WW
16-30 of 807