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57731H7WW General Electric - Instructions

All installation instructions for 57731H7WW parts

These instructions have been submitted by other PartSelect customers and can help guide you through the repair with useful information like difficulty of repair, length of repair, tools needed, and more.

All Instructions for the 57731H7WW
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Leaking drain hose

  • Customer: Eula from Harlan KY
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 30 - 60 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Pulled washer out. Removed cold and hot water hoses. Removed old drain hose. Cleaned up water. Placed clamp on new hose. Inserted hose. Screwed in screws that attaches clamp on washer. Inserted rubber tube into drain pipe. Inserted hose into rubber tube. Tightened clamp on rubber tube to seal drain hose and prevent blowback of drain water. Tested for leaks. Returned washer to its permanent location.

new tub seal still leaking.

  • Customer: john from Morris IL
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Pliers, Screw drivers, Wrench(Adjustable)
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Usual water leak from the tub seal after a few years. This allows water to seep between the tub bearing and the transmission output shaft destroying it and allowing water into the transmission itself usually locking up the bearings. I was fortunate. The transmission, although extremely noisy, wasn't locked up. The transmission output shaft is used as the surface the tub seal gland wipes against. Due to the zinc transmission casting, the surface the seal contacts was also corroded and 'grooved'. With a brand new tub seal installed, it still leaked due seepage past this groove. Normally, a new transmission would be in order. I repaired the old one using .008 brass shim stock and silicon RTV type sealant. Choice here was $200 for a transmission on a 5 year old washer or $69 for a piece of shim stock from the hardware store. Coat the housing around where the seal sits with a thin layer of RTV and wrap a single layer of shim stock around it secured with rubber bands until the RTV sets. Using an xacto knife, cut off the excess shim forming an extremely accurate 'butt' joint. Give it a once around with emery cloth for the sharp edges. This provides a new brass surface for the tub seal gland to press and seal against plus filling the corroded groove with the RTV as a backing. Since the tub bearing is also severely corroded with excessive clearance slop allowing the tub to wobble wildly on spin, it too needs to be replaced or repaired. As-is, the new seal would be destroyed in short order. Ideally, one would replace the it but seeing as how it's a big job and the machine has other issues, it wasn't worth the effort to me. Cut the remaining shim stock into 1/8" or so strips about 1" long and feed them down, one at a time, between the transmission output shaft OD and the tub bearing ID while forcing transmission shaft in the opposite direction until the excess slop is taken up. Oil or grease the shimmed bearing and the repaired transmission shaft liberally then reinstall the tub an usual. As a safety measure, apply RTV to the transmission spline shaft where it fits into the agitator making a air tight interface. This will 'bubble' the transmission bearing and seal area away from water contact not unlike a glass turned upside down in a pan of water. Should head off additional problems. By allowing oil to 'seep' into the transmission along side the seal on the spline shaft when it was apart, it too was repaired and is no longer making the screaching noise when spinning and does it's normal amusing "Texas Two-Step" when washing that it hasn't done in a year or so.

Knob would turn but not advance cycles.

  • Customer: Vicki from Smithville MO
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
I followed the video instructions and it was a piece of cake! I was reluctant because usually my "fix it" projects never go as easy as it's supposed to. lol This was REALLY easy. I have recommended this website to several people and will use it again if I have to replace other parts.

Washer would not pump out

  • Customer: RONALD from BRADFORD RI
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Screw drivers
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Took the front cover off and tapped the motor on the old pump with the end of a screwdriver. The pump immediately started pumping,so, I knew it was the problem. Ordered the new pump and motor from PartSelect and received it in 2 days. Removed the old assembly and replaced it with the new one in less than 30 minutes per the video instructions on PartSelect's website. Wife is happy :) and I saved at least $100 bucks, probably more. Btw, a local appliance dealer where I bought the washer, wanted $63 for the pump/motor assembly and said it would take 4-5 days to get it. I paid $42 including shipping from PartSelect, and received it in 2 days!

selector nob would not wouk

  • Customer: RICK from SPICEWOOD TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
remove top panel, replace the compression clip, then replace'd the top panel, w/pliers, remove'd then plastic clip from the timer knob, remove old knob, install new one, DONE! I've never had a place that had all parts in stock, and at my door with-in 2 days! UN-BELEIVABLE! THANKS

Teeth Missing on Timer Knob

  • Customer: Bryan from League City TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
I removed the plastic pin, took the knob off, put the new one on, then replaced the plastic pin. EXTREMELY easy.

hole in hose

  • Customer: hirfa from lake worth FL
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Wrench set
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
order part. replace

timer will not advance/will not start cycle

  • Customer: cyrus from Eureka CA
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
I viewed the video provided by Parts Select. It was very helpful in providing the confidence I needed to get the repair done. Easily solved my problem in less than three minutes. Anyone can do this. The top plastic knob has slots built into it's shaft bottom that engange the bottom timer mechanism. These were completely worn out on mine, so that the top knob DID NOT ENGAGE THE TEETH ON THE BOTTOM PLASTIC RECEPTOR PART OF THE TIMING MECHANISM! The new part solved this problem. Works just like it did before. Thank you very much PartSelect for the prompt delivery of the parts and the instructional video! I hope this helps anyone else who experiences the same problem.

I bought this second hand and it had no hose

  • Customer: Maryellen from Englewood FL
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
I watched the video you provided and I could't believe how simple it was. I'm 67 yrs old and I just followed the video instructions.

Water on the floor

  • Customer: Damian from Cypress TX
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Screw drivers
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
We discovered water on the floor every time we washed clothes and hoped it wasn't the tub or something more structural. Luckily, it was just a busted drain hose. Went to the local home improvement stores and couldn't find the right part. Found PartSelect online and found it easily. From order to receipt took three days...from box to installation < 10 minutes.

broken dampening strap

  • Customer: Priscilla from Beverly MA
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: 15 - 30 mins
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Socket set
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Watched the video, read installation instructions.
Replaced four broken dampening straps, washer is quiet and all is good.

Original pump failed, leaking at shaft seal.

  • Customer: Gerald from Corpus Christi TX
  • Difficulty: A Bit Difficult
  • Time to Complete: 1- 2 hours
  • Tools Required: Nutdriver, Socket set
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Replaced pump. New pump same manufacturer and model, but better built; however, base plate not same, requiring that I swap it for the original. Also, pump suction inlet is straight-in, whereas original has 90 degree connection. Disconnect power, and remove old pump. Purchase a 1 1/2" I.D. auto radiator hose, cut off use the 90 degree bend; it's a perfect fit to pump conn.; use a 1" PVC coupling on other end socket to mate to the washer drum convoluted drain hose socket. Throw away the crappy original G.E. hard-to-use spring hose clamps and use stainless steel automotive type gear clamps instead. WARNING: Do not try to bend, stretch, or kink the rubber tub drain hose to fit up to the pump without installing an elbow; the installation geometry must be exactly the same as the factory-designed installation. To finish the job, power up and run the machine through several cycles with the front cover off to check for leaks. You will also see why the rubber drain hose must be reinstalled as described above. This washer does not ramp down speed when in the spin cycle, and when the motor stops, the drum makes a sudden 15 to 30 degree rotation, stretching the drain hose to it's limit. Finally, keep your hands out of the machine when it's running; the motor, belt, and transmission drive can cause some real damage if you get tangled up in them. Pay attention to what you are doing; if you are confused by my little dissertation, hire someone qualified to do the job for you.

Broke timer knob

  • Customer: Kelvin from Mebane NC
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
I used the piler to take off the old knob then install the new one.

Washer would no longer spin---dry rotten belt

  • Customer: Joshua from Cumberland Gap TN
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required: Pliers, Screw drivers
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
Gently turned washer over onto its front. Removed bottom metal panel (3 or 4 screws on each side). Removed old belt. Installed new belt. NOTE: The new belt is a tight and perfect fit, therefore it will not want fit on to both pulleys/ rotating discs. I have found the best method is to start the belt on the disc that drives the belt. Then place as much of the belt over the disc that sits below the washing machine drum as is possible(the spinning part)and then turn the belt by hand and the belt should pop on to the disc. If the belt goes on easily you may have the wrong belt as the belt must be tight to achieve the traction necessary for the washing machine to spin. HOPE THIS HELPS!! A screwdriver may be handy in helping to pry on the belt. Good look.

Agitator paddles broken because I had a big brush in the wash load.

  • Customer: Michael from Apache Junction AZ
  • Difficulty: Really easy
  • Time to Complete: Less than 15 mins
  • Tools Required:
  • 0 of 0 people found this instruction helpful
First I removed the softener dispenser then I grabbed the agitator at the bottom and with a tug completely removed it. I took the new part out of the box and lowered it down over the hub in the bottom of the washer and gently pushed it until it snapped in place. Then I re-installed the old fabric softener dispenser and the job was complete.
All Instructions for the 57731H7WW
301-315 of 375